Posts tagged urbanization

From thisbigcity:

To the north, historic development in a Spanish region. To the south, urban design fuelled by Spain’s real estate boom. 
Urban growth in Spain is seriously disjointed. We take a look in more detail in our latest post. 

A great visual look at how urban development can evolve along different ways. 

From thisbigcity:

To the north, historic development in a Spanish region. To the south, urban design fuelled by Spain’s real estate boom. 

Urban growth in Spain is seriously disjointed. We take a look in more detail in our latest post

A great visual look at how urban development can evolve along different ways. 

From theatlantic:

Apartments So Small They Can Only Be Photographed From Above

In crazy dense Hong Kong, 100,000 of the city’s laborers live in sub-divided apartment units averaging 40 square feet.

See more. [Images: Society for Community Organization]

For the next time you complain about the size of your dorm room. 

A fantastic interactive map of populations. Notice that most of the Americas (an that includes Latin America) is highly urban. Despite some of the world’s largest cities, most of Asia is less urban than the Americas. And only a few pockets of the world remain rural.
In fact, the country I tend to study the most, Bolivia is today about 67% urban. That’s on par with Italy (68%), only slightly lower than Germany (74%), and higher than Poland (61%). Still think Latin America is a land of rural peasants? Think again.
From sunfoundation:

Growing urban populations

In this simple interactive animation by Periscopic, in partnership with UNICEF, we see the changes in urban population from 1950 up to present, through projections for 2050. Circle size represents urban population and color is an indicator for the percentage of people living in cities or towns.

A fantastic interactive map of populations. Notice that most of the Americas (an that includes Latin America) is highly urban. Despite some of the world’s largest cities, most of Asia is less urban than the Americas. And only a few pockets of the world remain rural.

In fact, the country I tend to study the most, Bolivia is today about 67% urban. That’s on par with Italy (68%), only slightly lower than Germany (74%), and higher than Poland (61%). Still think Latin America is a land of rural peasants? Think again.

From sunfoundation:

Growing urban populations

In this simple interactive animation by Periscopic, in partnership with UNICEF, we see the changes in urban population from 1950 up to present, through projections for 2050. Circle size represents urban population and color is an indicator for the percentage of people living in cities or towns.

An interesting look at public transportation in Mexico City, one of the world’s largest metropolitan areas. From globalvoices:

The Federal District of Mexico City is the capital city of the United States of Mexico and has a population of 8,851,080 inhabitants (the Mexico City Metropolitan Area has 20,137,152 inhabitants), according to the latest official census. Most of them use the public transportation network daily to travel from their home to their place of work, education or entertainment.
Read more: Mexico: The Reality of Public Transportation in Mexico City

An interesting look at public transportation in Mexico City, one of the world’s largest metropolitan areas. From globalvoices:

The Federal District of Mexico City is the capital city of the United States of Mexico and has a population of 8,851,080 inhabitants (the Mexico City Metropolitan Area has 20,137,152 inhabitants), according to the latest official census. Most of them use the public transportation network daily to travel from their home to their place of work, education or entertainment.

Read more: Mexico: The Reality of Public Transportation in Mexico City

The urbanisation of Africa | The Economist
It’s interesting to note that Africa is becoming as urban as the rest of the world, and very rapidly. The implications of that will certainly have significant international consequences (for the environment, economics, and more).

The urbanisation of Africa | The Economist

It’s interesting to note that Africa is becoming as urban as the rest of the world, and very rapidly. The implications of that will certainly have significant international consequences (for the environment, economics, and more).