Posts tagged social class

From nprfreshair:

Linguist Geoff Nunberg wonders what exactly students learn when they’re flipping through those SAT vocabulary flashcards —-

"Faith in vocabulary begins with the belief that every new word you learn comes tied to a new idea. But the words you study are always tied to old ones. That’s what flashcards are for, to pair exotic words with familiar ones: "amicable" means friendly, "superficial" means shallow. That’s all you need to know to answer those SAT sentence-completion questions. "They tried to interest her in many things but they couldn’t overcome her _______." Should it be (a) apathy, (b) fervor, (c) acuity or (d) aloofness? It’s “apathy,” of course — what they want you to do is fill in the blank with the word that makes the resulting sentence least interesting.”

[Image: timlewisnm/flickr]

Let’s be honest, SAT and similar tests are best designed to determine how comfortable you are with a certain kind of education system. Specifically, the one found in upper middle class (and predominantly white) American society.

From nprfreshair:

Linguist Geoff Nunberg wonders what exactly students learn when they’re flipping through those SAT vocabulary flashcards —-

"Faith in vocabulary begins with the belief that every new word you learn comes tied to a new idea. But the words you study are always tied to old ones. That’s what flashcards are for, to pair exotic words with familiar ones: "amicable" means friendly, "superficial" means shallow. That’s all you need to know to answer those SAT sentence-completion questions. "They tried to interest her in many things but they couldn’t overcome her _______." Should it be (a) apathy, (b) fervor, (c) acuity or (d) aloofness? It’s “apathy,” of course — what they want you to do is fill in the blank with the word that makes the resulting sentence least interesting.”

[Image: timlewisnm/flickr]

Let’s be honest, SAT and similar tests are best designed to determine how comfortable you are with a certain kind of education system. Specifically, the one found in upper middle class (and predominantly white) American society.

From theatlantic:

America’s Top Colleges Have a Rich Kid Problem

The wealthiest schools in the country could have more economic diversity if they wanted it. So why don’t they?

Read more. [Top image: Century Foundation]

This is how the social class system is reproduced. Meet the modern America. It’s starting to look a lot like 1800s Europe.

A fascinating look at class relationships (pun intended) in Britain.
From guardian:

Think class in relationships was only an issue in Jane Austen’s time? Think again. We talk to three couples about their experience of coupling ‘up’ and ‘down’
Photograph: Matthew Farrant for the Guardian

A fascinating look at class relationships (pun intended) in Britain.

From guardian:

Think class in relationships was only an issue in Jane Austen’s time? Think again. We talk to three couples about their experience of coupling ‘up’ and ‘down’

Photograph: Matthew Farrant for the Guardian

Titanic Survivors: A Breakdown by Class

A very interesting way to start a discussion about social class. How would this compare to, say, Katrina?

Via shortformblog:

thepoliticalnotebook:

  • First Class Passengers: 63% survived (200 out of 319 lived).
  • Second Class Passengers: 43% survived (117 out of 269 lived).
  • Third Class Passengers: 25% survived (172 out of 699 lived).

Any death, regardless of class, is a horrible and tragic thing, but on the anniversary of the Titanic’s sinking it’s important to remember one of the things that night symbolizes: that, even in moments of terrible crisis and great collective peril, we remain divided and valued by the ticket we can afford. 

[Data via John Henderson of Ithaca College]

A great lesson told through numbers.

There are as many domestic workers in London now as in Victorian times.
These days domestic workers are more likely to be self-employed, well-qualified and well-paid than their 19th century counterparts. Yet in some respects the industry has changed surprisingly little. (via theeconomist)