Posts tagged protests

La Desconfianza: The View from Western Caracas II

venezuelablog:

Rebecca Hanson

“It makes no sense! You go into a Chavista’s house and Chávez and Maduro’s faces are everywhere but you open their fridge and it is empty!  Empty!” This was the passionate reaction I received from an acquaintance I was chatting with yesterday when I commented that protests in Caracas have not seemed to receive support from popular sectors in the city.

His frustration came from seemingly inexplicable support for a government under whose watch food has become both more expensive and more difficult to find.

In the past year the large majority of Venezuelans have been hit hard by the food shortages this man was referencing. Indeed, it is specifically for this reason that some hoped protests would unite the country around common concerns and cross class lines.

Nevertheless, the protests have remained largely identified with the middle and upper classes, failing to gain traction in the popular sectors. Rather than uniting Venezuela it seems more likely that protests have deepened divisions and polarization.  

Why have common concerns not produced cross-class concerted action here? Just last year we saw exactly this happen with Brazil’s “Spring of Unrest.”

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Excellent analysis.

globalvoices:

Not even the rain will be able to put out the fire of our indignation.

Around 3000 people took to the streets in Paraguay’s capital to make their voices heard against Parliament, following the trend of protests in Brazil these last few weeks.

The summoning of civilians for Friday 21st June was made via social media networks, under the hashtag #porunparaguaymejor. [“For a better Paraguay”]

The Brazil Effect: Thousands Protest ‘For a Better Paraguay’

Could this be the start of a “Latin American Spring”? Worth keeping an eye on.

thepoliticalnotebook:

Picture of the Day: Moscow, Russia. Police attempt to disperse anti-Putin protesters.
News: After a stint as prime minister under Medvedev, Putin has once again been sworn in as president. He has nominated Medvedev as his prime minister. That’s not an endless revolving door or anything…. His inauguration was met with lots of protesting, and police rounded up anyone wearing the opposition’s symbolic white ribbon, arresting roughly 700 protesters as of Monday evening, and referring many of the young male detainees to the draft office.
Read: Julia Ioffe for the New Yorker’s News Desk: “Putin’s Inauguration: Satire and Violence” and Regina Smyth for the Monkey Cage: “Russia’s Growing Opposition.”
Watch: Video of riot police cracking down on anti-Putin protests.
Credit: Sergey Ponomarev/AP. Via.
View more Picture of the Day posts. Submit a photo.

It’s like 1989 again. But in China, not the Soviet Union. Very odd.
But, seriously, Russia became a model for the new “competitive authoritarian” regime classification. Left unresolved has always been the question of when a “competitive” authoritarian regime simply becomes a traditional authoritarian regime. Has Russia crossed that line yet? Or nyet?

thepoliticalnotebook:

Picture of the DayMoscow, Russia. Police attempt to disperse anti-Putin protesters.

News: After a stint as prime minister under Medvedev, Putin has once again been sworn in as president. He has nominated Medvedev as his prime minister. That’s not an endless revolving door or anything…. His inauguration was met with lots of protesting, and police rounded up anyone wearing the opposition’s symbolic white ribbon, arresting roughly 700 protesters as of Monday evening, and referring many of the young male detainees to the draft office.

Read: Julia Ioffe for the New Yorker’s News Desk: “Putin’s Inauguration: Satire and Violence” and Regina Smyth for the Monkey Cage: “Russia’s Growing Opposition.”

Watch: Video of riot police cracking down on anti-Putin protests.

Credit: Sergey Ponomarev/AP. Via.

View more Picture of the Day posts. Submit a photo.

It’s like 1989 again. But in China, not the Soviet Union. Very odd.

But, seriously, Russia became a model for the new “competitive authoritarian” regime classification. Left unresolved has always been the question of when a “competitive” authoritarian regime simply becomes a traditional authoritarian regime. Has Russia crossed that line yet? Or nyet?

adam-wola:

“Shock,” Ana Tijoux’s tribute to Chile’s burgeoning student protest movement. See also the video for “Sacar la Voz.”

I was actually going to use this in class today while we discussed Chile’s unique binominal electoral system.

The unique electoral system—which uses two-seat districts with an open-list PR formula—is a legacy of the Pinochet era. It was consciously designed to ensure that conservatives (about 1/3 of the electorate) could ensure nearly 50% of the seats.

Two decades after the transition to democracy, many Chileans (particularly younger ones with little or no memory of the Pinochet dictatorship) are demanding reforms to the Pinochet-imposed institutional framework.

BTW, you should check out Ana Tijoux’s autobiographical “1977”.

Russians voted today in a hotly contested presidential election—the first truly contested election in recent memory. The official results will certainly favor Putin (that was known months ago). It’s the aftermath that maters.
From newshour:

Margaret Warner reports from Moscow:
“I’ve covered every American presidential election since 1976, and I have to say, I’ve not seen voters more determined than they seemed today in Russia. “In former times, we just lay in the bed,” 60-year-old art historian Natalya Simonova, voting in the village of Desna, told me. But not this time. “This year … we feel we’re not slaves, and we can do something.”“
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Russians voted today in a hotly contested presidential election—the first truly contested election in recent memory. The official results will certainly favor Putin (that was known months ago). It’s the aftermath that maters.

From newshour:

Margaret Warner reports from Moscow:

“I’ve covered every American presidential election since 1976, and I have to say, I’ve not seen voters more determined than they seemed today in Russia. “In former times, we just lay in the bed,” 60-year-old art historian Natalya Simonova, voting in the village of Desna, told me. But not this time. “This year … we feel we’re not slaves, and we can do something.”“

More


People are, of course, tweeting about Syria, but interest seems to be more concentrated among activists or Middle East specialists.
The wider social media audience hasn’t engaged in the way it did with Iran and Egypt. As we can see from these estimates below, the volume of Syria-related tweets (as a percentage of overall tweets) appears considerably lower than the volume related to the uprisings in Egypt and Iran.
The estimates were constructed using multiple published Web sources reporting on number of tweets for the observed events as well as total Twitter traffic over time, including Twitter’s blog, Customer Insight Group, Mashable, the Sysomos blog, and a dataset acquired via Twapperkeeper.
The estimates are not precise but should be roughly representative of the average Twitter traffic at the observed time period.
Slate: Social revolution fatigue - why don’t we care about Syria?

This is fascinating.

People are, of course, tweeting about Syria, but interest seems to be more concentrated among activists or Middle East specialists.

The wider social media audience hasn’t engaged in the way it did with Iran and Egypt. As we can see from these estimates below, the volume of Syria-related tweets (as a percentage of overall tweets) appears considerably lower than the volume related to the uprisings in Egypt and Iran.

The estimates were constructed using multiple published Web sources reporting on number of tweets for the observed events as well as total Twitter traffic over time, including Twitter’s blog, Customer Insight Group, Mashable, the Sysomos blog, and a dataset acquired via Twapperkeeper.

The estimates are not precise but should be roughly representative of the average Twitter traffic at the observed time period.

Slate: Social revolution fatigue - why don’t we care about Syria?

This is fascinating.

From newshour:

In Syria, the ongoing uprisings have claimed the lives of over 3,500  people since the uprising began eight months ago.
FRONTLINE PBS reporter  Ramita Navai went undercover to report from inside Syria, embedded with  some of the country’s most wanted dissidents and activists.
She talked about her experience, at NewsHour here. 
Watch the full feature at FRONTLINE , replay a live chat from FRONTLINE and check out this interactive map.

From newshour:

In Syria, the ongoing uprisings have claimed the lives of over 3,500 people since the uprising began eight months ago.

FRONTLINE PBS reporter Ramita Navai went undercover to report from inside Syria, embedded with some of the country’s most wanted dissidents and activists.

She talked about her experience, at NewsHour here.

Watch the full feature at FRONTLINE , replay a live chat from FRONTLINE and check out this interactive map.

For a sobering slap in the face, check out the 99 percent Tumblr blog.

Looking at that, I’m not sure whether to be more upset that so many of my students don’t seem to be interested in seizing every opportunity in my classroom—or sympathetic since, well, what’s the point?

An interesting example of the intersection of pop culture & global politics. 

From globalvoices:

Dressed like the Na’vi tribe from the 2009 science-fiction film Avatar, Cambodian villagers protested the plan to clear the Prey Lang forest to make way for the establishment of plantations and mines.

This is a  documentary about Prey Lang, “One Forest, One Future”, by Jocelyn and Ben Pederick.

The Rock Band of timelines, and other good interactive features on the protests
This interactive feature on the Middle East protest wave from The New Yorker is just too awesome.

The Rock Band of timelines, and other good interactive features on the protests

This interactive feature on the Middle East protest wave from The New Yorker is just too awesome.