Posts tagged population

pritheworld:

How old were you when you had your first child? The United Nations gathered this data on when women in developing countries have theirs.

More on pregnancy and childbirth in a series called The Ninth Month.

A Real-Time Map of Births and Deaths

statedept:

Today is World Population Day. 
Did you know that about 16 million girls under age 18 give birth each year and another 3.2 million undergo unsafe abortions?
This year the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) is raising awareness of the issue of adolescent pregnancy in the hopes of delivering a world where every pregnancy is wanted, every childbirth is safe, and every young person’s potential is fulfilled.
Via united-nations

statedept:

Today is World Population Day. 

Did you know that about 16 million girls under age 18 give birth each year and another 3.2 million undergo unsafe abortions?

This year the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) is raising awareness of the issue of adolescent pregnancy in the hopes of delivering a world where every pregnancy is wanted, every childbirth is safe, and every young person’s potential is fulfilled.

Via united-nations

From theeconomist:

Daily chart: the age of man. In 2011, the average person was just under 32. By the end of this century the average person will be a little over 42 and newborns can expect to live to 81.

The chart also suggests that the world’s population growth is starting to slow down. And the world’s population may stabilize at around 10 billion. Interesting.

From theeconomist:

Daily chart: the age of man. In 2011, the average person was just under 32. By the end of this century the average person will be a little over 42 and newborns can expect to live to 81.

The chart also suggests that the world’s population growth is starting to slow down. And the world’s population may stabilize at around 10 billion. Interesting.

A fantastic interactive map of populations. Notice that most of the Americas (an that includes Latin America) is highly urban. Despite some of the world’s largest cities, most of Asia is less urban than the Americas. And only a few pockets of the world remain rural.
In fact, the country I tend to study the most, Bolivia is today about 67% urban. That’s on par with Italy (68%), only slightly lower than Germany (74%), and higher than Poland (61%). Still think Latin America is a land of rural peasants? Think again.
From sunfoundation:

Growing urban populations

In this simple interactive animation by Periscopic, in partnership with UNICEF, we see the changes in urban population from 1950 up to present, through projections for 2050. Circle size represents urban population and color is an indicator for the percentage of people living in cities or towns.

A fantastic interactive map of populations. Notice that most of the Americas (an that includes Latin America) is highly urban. Despite some of the world’s largest cities, most of Asia is less urban than the Americas. And only a few pockets of the world remain rural.

In fact, the country I tend to study the most, Bolivia is today about 67% urban. That’s on par with Italy (68%), only slightly lower than Germany (74%), and higher than Poland (61%). Still think Latin America is a land of rural peasants? Think again.

From sunfoundation:

Growing urban populations

In this simple interactive animation by Periscopic, in partnership with UNICEF, we see the changes in urban population from 1950 up to present, through projections for 2050. Circle size represents urban population and color is an indicator for the percentage of people living in cities or towns.

A fantastic interactive map, from npr:

To sustain themselves, many nations adopt policies to raise, lower, or  maintain their population levels. And while a country’s gross domestic  product may often predict its stance, that’s not always the case. Use our handy dandy interactive world map to learn more about them.
(via World Map: Population Density, Fertility, GDP, And Policies To Control Or Boost Fertility)

A fantastic interactive map, from npr:

To sustain themselves, many nations adopt policies to raise, lower, or maintain their population levels. And while a country’s gross domestic product may often predict its stance, that’s not always the case. Use our handy dandy interactive world map to learn more about them.

(via World Map: Population Density, Fertility, GDP, And Policies To Control Or Boost Fertility)

From npr:

The United Nations says today symbolically marks the moment when the  world’s population reaches 7 billion. A little more than two centuries  ago, the global population was 1 billion. How did it grow so big so  fast? With the help of a sound montage and video, it gets a little  easier to see how the Earth can produce that kind of a crowd.
Watch our video: 7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast
Photo: Adam Cole, Maggie Starbard / NPR

From npr:

The United Nations says today symbolically marks the moment when the world’s population reaches 7 billion. A little more than two centuries ago, the global population was 1 billion. How did it grow so big so fast? With the help of a sound montage and video, it gets a little easier to see how the Earth can produce that kind of a crowd.

Watch our video: 7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast

Photo: Adam Cole, Maggie Starbard / NPR

From theatlantic:

Population Seven Billion

Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges. Meeting the basic needs of so many will mean growing, shipping, and distributing more food while providing more clean water, health care, and shelter — all without inflicting too much further damage on our environment.
Above: A densely populated neighborhood in West Delhi, India, seen from above via Google Earth.

See more incredible photos at In Focus

From theatlantic:

Population Seven Billion

Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges. Meeting the basic needs of so many will mean growing, shipping, and distributing more food while providing more clean water, health care, and shelter — all without inflicting too much further damage on our environment.

Above: A densely populated neighborhood in West Delhi, India, seen from above via Google Earth.

See more incredible photos at In Focus

From shortformblog:

Is this the 7 billionth person on the planet? Possibly. Danica Camacho, the symbolic 7 billionth baby in the Philippines, is shown with her mother, Camille Galura. Camacho was born two minutes before midnight on Monday morning, with much cheering and fanfare and all that fun stuff. Now, here’s a Filipino health official to burst a bubble in that fun: ”Seven billion is a number we should think about deeply,” said Dr. Eric Tayag of the Philippines’ Department of Health. “We should really focus on the question of whether there will be food, clean water, shelter, education and a decent life for every child. If the answer is ‘no,’ it would be better for people to look at easing this population explosion.” Jeez, dude. Such a (basically correct) buzzkill. (AP Photo)

From shortformblog:

Is this the 7 billionth person on the planet? Possibly. Danica Camacho, the symbolic 7 billionth baby in the Philippines, is shown with her mother, Camille Galura. Camacho was born two minutes before midnight on Monday morning, with much cheering and fanfare and all that fun stuff. Now, here’s a Filipino health official to burst a bubble in that fun: ”Seven billion is a number we should think about deeply,” said Dr. Eric Tayag of the Philippines’ Department of Health. “We should really focus on the question of whether there will be food, clean water, shelter, education and a decent life for every child. If the answer is ‘no,’ it would be better for people to look at easing this population explosion.” Jeez, dude. Such a (basically correct) buzzkill. (AP Photo)

From newshour:

This BBC News interactive is pretty mind-boggling.
Example: Jim Lehrer was the 2,156,395,664th person alive on Earth and 74,298,587,966th person to have lived since history began.
Try it here
On Monday, a baby will be born somewhere and demographers will proclaim that the world’s population has reached 7 billion.  Read more here.

From newshour:

This BBC News interactive is pretty mind-boggling.

Example: Jim Lehrer was the 2,156,395,664th person alive on Earth and 74,298,587,966th person to have lived since history began.

Try it here

On Monday, a baby will be born somewhere and demographers will proclaim that the world’s population has reached 7 billion.  Read more here.