Posts tagged industrialization

npr:

How the Garment Industry Came to Bangladesh 

Definitely using this in my politics of developing countries course next semester.

npr:

How the Garment Industry Came to Bangladesh 

Definitely using this in my politics of developing countries course next semester.

From pritheworld:


You might be surprised to find that most of the decline in China’s fertility rate happened before the one-child policy was enacted in 1982. The World’s Mary Kay Magistad investigates the future of the one-child policy in China as part of her “China Past Due” series: http://ow.ly/kwz37

Interesting. It does seem like China’s fertility rate was barely impacted by the one-child policy. If so, what does this tell us about China? Does it fit the general historical pattern of industrializing societies?

From pritheworld:

You might be surprised to find that most of the decline in China’s fertility rate happened before the one-child policy was enacted in 1982. The World’s Mary Kay Magistad investigates the future of the one-child policy in China as part of her “China Past Due” series: http://ow.ly/kwz37

Interesting. It does seem like China’s fertility rate was barely impacted by the one-child policy. If so, what does this tell us about China? Does it fit the general historical pattern of industrializing societies?

Definitely worth a read.
From theatlantic:

Why the iPhone Isn’t Building a New U.S. Middle Class

Short answer: it’s not just wages. The vastly different wages paid to American workers, compared to contemporaries in Taiwan or China, is a significant factor in the shift of massive supply chain operations in the tech industry over to Asia, The New York Times says in its in-depth examination of Apple and its suppliers.
Takeaway factoid someone will repeat in your earshot this week: manufacturing the iPhone in the United States would add about $65 to the cost of each unit. Is that worth it?
But it’s not just about the wages. The biggest shocks of the paper’s examination of Foxconn, one of Apple’s major suppliers for the iPhone, are about physical scale, not payscale. The plant known as Foxconn City employes some 230,000 workers, with more than one quarter of them living on-site in company-built dormitories, The Times reports. The kitchens that feed the workers churn out 13 tons of rice per day, and guards work the hallways to prevent workers from trampling one another.
And the most chilling assessments of the U.S. labor market’s inability to share in some of this new manufacturing activity speak to simple inability to compete. Read more.

Definitely worth a read.

From theatlantic:

Why the iPhone Isn’t Building a New U.S. Middle Class

Short answer: it’s not just wages. The vastly different wages paid to American workers, compared to contemporaries in Taiwan or China, is a significant factor in the shift of massive supply chain operations in the tech industry over to Asia, The New York Times says in its in-depth examination of Apple and its suppliers.

Takeaway factoid someone will repeat in your earshot this week: manufacturing the iPhone in the United States would add about $65 to the cost of each unit. Is that worth it?

But it’s not just about the wages. The biggest shocks of the paper’s examination of Foxconn, one of Apple’s major suppliers for the iPhone, are about physical scale, not payscale. The plant known as Foxconn City employes some 230,000 workers, with more than one quarter of them living on-site in company-built dormitories, The Times reports. The kitchens that feed the workers churn out 13 tons of rice per day, and guards work the hallways to prevent workers from trampling one another.

And the most chilling assessments of the U.S. labor market’s inability to share in some of this new manufacturing activity speak to simple inability to compete. Read more.

Interesting historical retrospective on the labor movement from Life:

The first recorded organized workers’ strike wasn’t at an English coal mine or a French auto plant — but at a necropolis, or huge burial ground, in ancient Egypt in the 12th century BC. (It worked; authorities raised the artisan’s wages.) But it was the Industrial Revolution nearly 3,000 years later — and the rise of the modern labor movement in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries — that sparked the enormous, sometimes violent, frequently history-making strikes we remember today. Sometimes strikes succeed; just as often, they’re broken, either by attrition, or by brute force. But the driving beliefs behind virtually all labor actions — that workers deserve humane working conditions, a living wage, and freedom from management or governmental corruption — remain the same.
Strike! Famous Worker Uprisings

Interesting historical retrospective on the labor movement from Life:

The first recorded organized workers’ strike wasn’t at an English coal mine or a French auto plant — but at a necropolis, or huge burial ground, in ancient Egypt in the 12th century BC. (It worked; authorities raised the artisan’s wages.) But it was the Industrial Revolution nearly 3,000 years later — and the rise of the modern labor movement in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries — that sparked the enormous, sometimes violent, frequently history-making strikes we remember today. Sometimes strikes succeed; just as often, they’re broken, either by attrition, or by brute force. But the driving beliefs behind virtually all labor actions — that workers deserve humane working conditions, a living wage, and freedom from management or governmental corruption — remain the same.

Strike! Famous Worker Uprisings