Posts tagged foreign intervention

This in-depth, fascinating report on the hunt for Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, is well worth reading. It’s also great for discussions about international response, in various ways: Is foreign intervention justified? What should we do about Kony? But, most interestingly, what does the African Union’s intervention (coupled with its involvement in Somalia) tell us about increasing capabilities of African states?

The Hunt for Kony By Scott Johnson, thedailybeast.com
In Newsweek Mag­a­zine
Maj. Richard Kidega threaded his way through a thicket of sweet black trees and thorny underbrush when suddenly he drew to a halt. A young Ugandan soldier in front had raised a clenched fist: the sign to stop. With their AK-47s raised, Kidega and his men silently scanned the jungle for any signs of the enemy, such as fresh tracks or trampled brush. Hanging vines clogged the path. Dry leaves masked deep holes. The gully was an attractive place for an ambush. “It’s places just like this where the LRA likes to hide,” Kidega whispered, as the hunt for Joseph Kony, rebel leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, slowly moved ahead.
Read the rest

This in-depth, fascinating report on the hunt for Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, is well worth reading. It’s also great for discussions about international response, in various ways: Is foreign intervention justified? What should we do about Kony? But, most interestingly, what does the African Union’s intervention (coupled with its involvement in Somalia) tell us about increasing capabilities of African states?

The Hunt for Kony
By Scott Johnson, thedailybeast.com

In Newsweek Mag­a­zine

Maj. Richard Kidega threaded his way through a thicket of sweet black trees and thorny underbrush when suddenly he drew to a halt. A young Ugandan soldier in front had raised a clenched fist: the sign to stop. With their AK-47s raised, Kidega and his men silently scanned the jungle for any signs of the enemy, such as fresh tracks or trampled brush. Hanging vines clogged the path. Dry leaves masked deep holes. The gully was an attractive place for an ambush. “It’s places just like this where the LRA likes to hide,” Kidega whispered, as the hunt for Joseph Kony, rebel leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, slowly moved ahead.

Read the rest

Armed Advice | Foreign Policy

A brief history of military advisors, in the context of the recent announcement by France/UK/Italy that they were sending “military advisors” to help the Libyan rebels.

100 Years Ago, World’s First Aerial Bomb Dropped Over Libya | NPR
History comes full circle, eh? But the book referenced (Gerard De Groot’s The Bomb) is an interesting look at the history of aerial bombardment (even if that’s not its main focus). But the concept of “air war” has a long, fascinating history—going back to early 20th century science fiction (see H. G. Wells’s The War in the Air).

100 Years Ago, World’s First Aerial Bomb Dropped Over Libya | NPR

History comes full circle, eh? But the book referenced (Gerard De Groot’s The Bomb) is an interesting look at the history of aerial bombardment (even if that’s not its main focus). But the concept of “air war” has a long, fascinating history—going back to early 20th century science fiction (see H. G. Wells’s The War in the Air).

Libya and the question of intervention: 6 precedents

An interesting rundown of foreign interventions in comparative perspective, from theweekmagazine:

As the violence in Libya escalates, Western leaders are mulling some kind of intervention, with a no-fly zone among the possible courses of action. There’s hardly agreement on whether a no-fly zone could work — and many are reaching for the history books to back up their argument. Here, a list of six countries where Western intervention was hotly debated — and what they can teach us about Libya: Bosnia, Romania, Egypt, Somalia, Kosovo, Iraq.

Read the full article.