Posts tagged failed states

From foreignaffairsmagazine:

How Washington lost its way worrying about failed states: http://fam.ag/19yPMwG

From foreignaffairsmagazine:

How Washington lost its way worrying about failed states: http://fam.ag/19yPMwG

States & Taxes
This week in POL 102, we’re discussing the state. As part of that discussion, students are looking at the 2012 Failed States Index.
One of the things I try to impress on my students is that the old adage “the government that governs least, governs best” is not necessarily true (ask a Somali refugee). The top ten “failed” states include a number of countries with little or no effective governance. One way to think about the positive attributes of states is to simply look at the relationship between state “strength” (operationalized by the Failed States Index) and “size of government” (operationalized as tax burden as a % of GDP, with data from the Heritage Foundation). The above graph shows that relationship.
The graph shows that states with smaller tax revenues tend to have higher Failed States Index scores. This simple statistical model explains about 36.5% of variation in the data (R2=0.36501), so the relationship is not particularly strong. The data reflects a representative sample of 62 countries. The orange dot represents the US.

States & Taxes

This week in POL 102, we’re discussing the state. As part of that discussion, students are looking at the 2012 Failed States Index.

One of the things I try to impress on my students is that the old adage “the government that governs least, governs best” is not necessarily true (ask a Somali refugee). The top ten “failed” states include a number of countries with little or no effective governance. One way to think about the positive attributes of states is to simply look at the relationship between state “strength” (operationalized by the Failed States Index) and “size of government” (operationalized as tax burden as a % of GDP, with data from the Heritage Foundation). The above graph shows that relationship.

The graph shows that states with smaller tax revenues tend to have higher Failed States Index scores. This simple statistical model explains about 36.5% of variation in the data (R2=0.36501), so the relationship is not particularly strong. The data reflects a representative sample of 62 countries. The orange dot represents the US.

The 2011 Failed States Index | Foreign Policy

If you’d like to tag along with my POL 102 class this semester, here’s your chance. Once a week I assign a web based assignment to go along with the topic of our chapter textbook (we’re using The Good Society: An Introduction to Comparative Politics).

This week we read about the state. So tomorrow we’re going to discuss the annual Foreign Policy Failed States Index.

I often make a similar illustration when I teach the concept of “the state” in my introduction to comparative politics course.

I often make a similar illustration when I teach the concept of “the state” in my introduction to comparative politics course.

FP: Failed States Index 2010

Whenever we discuss states in my comparative politics class, I make sure to spend time discussing “failed states” as a way to understand why states matter. It’s a great way to force students to reconsider why a “legitimate monopoly over the means of violence” is better than it sounds, in practice. For the past six years Foreign Policy has published a Failed States Index. It’s well worth assigning. Check out the interactive rankings map.

Cutthroat Capitalism: An Economic Analysis of the Somali Pirate Business Model
This story from Wired is useful for discussion of the politics around piracy in places like Somalia (or other failed states). But it can also be a great way to illustrate some of the principles of rational choice. I use it in my research methods class to illustrate elegant/information data design/presentation. If you want to assign this to a class, be sure you download the PDF version available from Wired.

Cutthroat Capitalism: An Economic Analysis of the Somali Pirate Business Model

This story from Wired is useful for discussion of the politics around piracy in places like Somalia (or other failed states). But it can also be a great way to illustrate some of the principles of rational choice. I use it in my research methods class to illustrate elegant/information data design/presentation. If you want to assign this to a class, be sure you download the PDF version available from Wired.

"Is Yemen the Next Afghanistan?" | New York Times Magazine

Yemen is in the news a lot lately. This summer, The New York Times Magazine published a lengthy story about Yemen that in hindsight seemed almost prophetic.

Comparative piracy | The Economist

This Economist videographic looks at how Malaysia & Indonesia (two strong states) were able to solve their piracy problem, but Somalia (a failed state) has been unable to. 

It’s interesting to think that failed states weren’t always so. How did Somalia go from seaside paradise to basket case in only two decades?
npr:

Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia, has been embroiled in civil war for nearly two decades. It was once known as the “Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and was a haven for tourists in the 1960s and ’70s.

It’s interesting to think that failed states weren’t always so. How did Somalia go from seaside paradise to basket case in only two decades?

npr:

Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia, has been embroiled in civil war for nearly two decades. It was once known as the “Pearl of the Indian Ocean” and was a haven for tourists in the 1960s and ’70s.