Posts tagged economic development

guardian:

The human cost of the Bangladeshi garment industry
How did the clothes you’re wearing get to you? We trace the human cost of the Bangladeshi garment industry in video, words and pictures. View the interactive

guardian:

The human cost of the Bangladeshi garment industry

How did the clothes you’re wearing get to you? We trace the human cost of the Bangladeshi garment industry in video, words and pictures. View the interactive

From adam-wola:


Wow, that’s depressing. A new World Bank paper plots 14 Latin American countries’ per-capita GDP, as a percentage of the United States’ per-capita GDP, since 1950.
Chile is the only Latin American country to have gained any economic ground relative to the United States in the past 60 years. Though most have gained some ground since 2000, these charts show the so-called “lost decade” of the 1980s casting a very long shadow.

From adam-wola:

Wow, that’s depressing. A new World Bank paper plots 14 Latin American countries’ per-capita GDP, as a percentage of the United States’ per-capita GDP, since 1950.

Chile is the only Latin American country to have gained any economic ground relative to the United States in the past 60 years. Though most have gained some ground since 2000, these charts show the so-called “lost decade” of the 1980s casting a very long shadow.

Developing Countries To Grow 5.3% in 2014

From worldbank:

image

According the latest Global Economic Prospects Report the world economy will strengthen in 2014. Much of the initial acceleration will reflect a pick-up in high income country growth, which after years of extreme weakness and outright recessions, appear to be finally emerging from the global financial crisis.

Data from the Global Economic Prospects Database (GEP). See more infographics from the GEP report here and here.

Good news for “third world” countries! Well, at least many of them. 

I’m curious to know how long the terms “third world” and “developing world” will last, once more and more countries achieve what countries like South Korea has.

From Cotton To Shirt, In 4 Gifs

From seedtoshirt:

After months of reporting and thousands of miles of travel, our T-shirt project is live. Check it out: planetmoney.com/shirt.

Thanks to everyone who ordered a shirt and followed us along the way. Please accept these four gifs as a small token of our gratitude.

1. The cotton for our shirts came from the Mississippi Delta.

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2. It was spun into yarn in factories in Indonesia (men’s shirt) and Colombia (women’s shirt).

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3. The yarn was knitted into fabric, dyed and sewn in Bangladesh (men’s shirt) and Colombia (women’s shirt).image

4. The shirts were printed in Brooklyn.

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P.S. If you want a second-generation Planet Money T-shirt, you can buy one here.

I’ve been following this since the beginning (and waiting for my t-shirt to arrive). And I’m definitely using this in my Politics of the Developing World class next semester.

The basic economic foundations of industrial capitalism as we’ve known them for the past 150 years or so have an activist state at their core…. the intuition that there’s some coherent account of what the ‘market distribution’ would be absent public policy is mistaken. You have policy choices all the way down.

Matthew Yglesias (via tofias)

Yes. It’s important to remember that capitalism (and the whole idea of “free markets” as we understand them) were only made possible with the emergence of modern states. States provide not only the security & stability necessary for markets, they also provide (at public expense) the basic infrastructure, jobs training (public education), the legal structure that protects property rights and enforce contracts, and more. To admit that doesn’t make someone a socialist or a proponent of interventionism.

But ignoring that reality makes one underestimate the fragility of capitalism and markets. There’s a reason why economic growth is steady and constant (minus the odd recession here and there) in Sweden, but not in Somalia.

"What is it about Singapore?" | Parag Khanna

A friend of mine (who lives in Singapore) sent me this link. It’s about the rise of an “Asian” entrepreneurial model that is challenging the traditional Western one. It’s a fascinating read.

Via publicradiointernational:

alexanderpf:

Stratfor: Chinese Investments in Africa via chrislindsay

While the U.S. is concerned about China’s influence in Africa, “the U.S. government is not in a position to do what China is doing nor would we necessarily want to,” said Todd Moss, a former State Department official who now runs The Emerging Africa Project at the Center for Global Development in Washington. More.

This offers an interesting look at three issues: 1) the new investment “boom” in Africa, 2) the emergence of China as a global power, and 3) the question of whether economics should be treated as a strategic policy arm (and if so, what are the consequences?).

Via publicradiointernational:

alexanderpf:

Stratfor: Chinese Investments in Africa via chrislindsay

While the U.S. is concerned about China’s influence in Africa, “the U.S. government is not in a position to do what China is doing nor would we necessarily want to,” said Todd Moss, a former State Department official who now runs The Emerging Africa Project at the Center for Global Development in Washington. More.

This offers an interesting look at three issues: 1) the new investment “boom” in Africa, 2) the emergence of China as a global power, and 3) the question of whether economics should be treated as a strategic policy arm (and if so, what are the consequences?).

From adam-wola:

The International Labor Organization’s new World of Work report [PDF] estimates that, of 62 developing countries measured, only six saw income inequality increase since 2002.
Five of the six are Latin American countries: Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras and Mexico.

Why is income inequality so endemic to Latin America? Why hasn’t continued, steady economic development reduced inequality in the region—and particularly in Mexico and Chile? In contrast, why is income inequality reduced in relatively similar countries like Brazil and Argentina?

From adam-wola:

The International Labor Organization’s new World of Work report [PDF] estimates that, of 62 developing countries measured, only six saw income inequality increase since 2002.

Five of the six are Latin American countries: Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras and Mexico.

Why is income inequality so endemic to Latin America? Why hasn’t continued, steady economic development reduced inequality in the region—and particularly in Mexico and Chile? In contrast, why is income inequality reduced in relatively similar countries like Brazil and Argentina?

Via theatlantic:

Where the Global 1% Live Now

There are now 63,000 households worldwide with $100 million or more in assets, up 29 percent since 2006 and projected to rise even higher in the future. The top ten current preferred locations for the ultra-rich are:
London
New York
Hong Kong
Paris
Singapore
Miami
Geneva
Shanghai
Beijing
Berlin
The report also asked respondents to predict the most important cities in 10 years. The projected key cities of 2022 include:
London
New York
Beijing
Shanghai
Singapore
Hong Kong
Paris
São Paulo
Geneva
Berlin
What’s behind these rankings? According to the report, the ultra-rich value cities that offer “personal safety and security” most, followed by “economic openness” and “social stability” which top “luxury housing” and “excellent educational opportunities.” […] But the rise of global superstar cities also has a dark side.
Read more. [Image: Shutterstock]

Via theatlantic:

Where the Global 1% Live Now

There are now 63,000 households worldwide with $100 million or more in assets, up 29 percent since 2006 and projected to rise even higher in the future. The top ten current preferred locations for the ultra-rich are:

  1. London
  2. New York
  3. Hong Kong
  4. Paris
  5. Singapore
  6. Miami
  7. Geneva
  8. Shanghai
  9. Beijing
  10. Berlin

The report also asked respondents to predict the most important cities in 10 years. The projected key cities of 2022 include:

  1. London
  2. New York
  3. Beijing
  4. Shanghai
  5. Singapore
  6. Hong Kong
  7. Paris
  8. São Paulo
  9. Geneva
  10. Berlin

What’s behind these rankings? According to the report, the ultra-rich value cities that offer “personal safety and security” most, followed by “economic openness” and “social stability” which top “luxury housing” and “excellent educational opportunities.” […] But the rise of global superstar cities also has a dark side.

Read more. [Image: Shutterstock]

Evidence that China’s development is for real. 
From theatlantic:

China Takes Aim at the Profitable Heart of U.S. Manufacturing

For a long time, Americans have channeled their fear about China’s factories into an exasperated, four-word refrain: They’re stealing our jobs! By offering low-wage competition to U.S. workers, the Chinese picked off low-end manufacturing work for multinational corporations, whether it was stitching shoes for Nike or assembling iPads for Apple.
In the last few years, though, the anxiety has shifted a bit. Instead of worrying we’ll be undercut on the price of manual labor, the concern is we could actually be out-competed in higher-end markets. You hear it when Democrats like President Obama talk about China winning the race on green jobs. And it came to my mind this week, thanks to a piece in Bloomberg Businessweek on China’s growing prowess in heavy industry.
While China transformed itself into the world’s top exporter by building light goods and electronics, the biggest chunk of its exports are now large, high-margin goods such as ships, locomotives, and construction equipment, as illustrated in the Businessweek graph above.
Not only are China’s capitalists moving in this direction, but they’re getting a hand from the government. As Businessweek reports, “Equipment manufacturing, shipbuilding, and cars are among the industries slated to receive $2.5 billion from the government this year to improve technology and product quality.”  
This should be of some concern to U.S. policy makers. Heavy machinery and transportation equipment are at the heart of the U.S. industrial base. They’re part of our Big Six manufacturing sectors, along with food, chemicals, electronics, and metal products. These are businesses where labor is a relatively small part of the overall cost of making the product, and where America’s technologically advanced factories have traditionally given us an edge. If they founder, there’s not much left to replace them. 
Read more. [Image: Bloomberg Businessweek]

Evidence that China’s development is for real. 

From theatlantic:

China Takes Aim at the Profitable Heart of U.S. Manufacturing

For a long time, Americans have channeled their fear about China’s factories into an exasperated, four-word refrain: They’re stealing our jobs! By offering low-wage competition to U.S. workers, the Chinese picked off low-end manufacturing work for multinational corporations, whether it was stitching shoes for Nike or assembling iPads for Apple.

In the last few years, though, the anxiety has shifted a bit. Instead of worrying we’ll be undercut on the price of manual labor, the concern is we could actually be out-competed in higher-end markets. You hear it when Democrats like President Obama talk about China winning the race on green jobs. And it came to my mind this week, thanks to a piece in Bloomberg Businessweek on China’s growing prowess in heavy industry.

While China transformed itself into the world’s top exporter by building light goods and electronics, the biggest chunk of its exports are now large, high-margin goods such as ships, locomotives, and construction equipment, as illustrated in the Businessweek graph above.

Not only are China’s capitalists moving in this direction, but they’re getting a hand from the government. As Businessweek reports, “Equipment manufacturing, shipbuilding, and cars are among the industries slated to receive $2.5 billion from the government this year to improve technology and product quality.”  

This should be of some concern to U.S. policy makers. Heavy machinery and transportation equipment are at the heart of the U.S. industrial base. They’re part of our Big Six manufacturing sectors, along with food, chemicals, electronics, and metal products. These are businesses where labor is a relatively small part of the overall cost of making the product, and where America’s technologically advanced factories have traditionally given us an edge. If they founder, there’s not much left to replace them. 

Read more. [Image: Bloomberg Businessweek]