Posts tagged data visualization

Via worldbank:

sunfoundation:

From The Atlantic:

Two researchers, Mark Graham and Stefano De Stabbata, at the Oxford Internet Institute have depicted the world’s “Internet empires” in a map, [above]. The map shows each nation’s most popular website, with the size of nations altered to reflect the number of Internet users there.

The map makes for a brief, informative look at how geographic—and universal—certain web tastes and habits are.

Oxford Internet Institute's note on the data:

The map uses freely available data retrieved Alexa on August 12th, 2013. The company has provided website analytics since 1996. Alexa collects data from millions of Internet users using one of over 25,000 different browser extensions, and the data used for this visualization were calculated “using a combination of the estimated average daily unique visitors to a site and the estimated number of pageviews on that site from users in that country over the past month”.

The data are visualised as a choropleth map, where the colour indicates each country’s most visited website. Starting from the evident dominance of two companies (Google and Facebook), whose colours (red and blue, respectively) cover most of the map, we styled the illustration as an old colonial map, and named it after the computer game series Age of Empire. A second map illustrates the same data, using the hexagonal cartogram of the Internet Population 2011.

Nice.

Via theatlantic:

Here Are the Countries Where Internet Freedom Has Declined Most

Interesting.
Too bad the graph is ruined by bad design. If you glance at it too quickly, it looks like US internet freedom is lower than China’s. You have to pay close attention to the color codes to realize that China is rated “not free” and the US is “free.” So the bars indicate decline from previous score, not relative position to other bars.

Via theatlantic:

Here Are the Countries Where Internet Freedom Has Declined Most

Interesting.

Too bad the graph is ruined by bad design. If you glance at it too quickly, it looks like US internet freedom is lower than China’s. You have to pay close attention to the color codes to realize that China is rated “not free” and the US is “free.” So the bars indicate decline from previous score, not relative position to other bars.

Mapping Billions of Tweets Around the World

worldbank:

Via Mashable:

“Ever wonder what it would look like to plot every single geotagged tweet since 2009 on a map? Twitter has done just that…They use billions of geotagged tweets: Every dot represents a tweet, with the brighter colors showing a higher concentration of tweets.”

Europe: 

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Tokyo: 

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Sao Paolo: 

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Moscow:  

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North America:

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Source: Flickr and Mashable

World Bank Dataviz: Latin America Has More Mobile Phones Than People

From worldbank:

Latin America has surpassed 100% mobile phone penetration. On average, there are 107 mobile phones per 100 people across the region.

However, this doesn’t mean everyone has a phone or that there’s is connectivity everywhere. According to data from Informa, many people in urban…

This is a fascinating statistic. I should point out that there are a few countries in Africa that are near or past 1:1 cell phone-to-people ratio (though, obviously, that doesn’t mean everyone has a cell phone). More evidence of an interesting convergence across the “developed” and “third” worlds.

There’s an interesting dimension to this about the future of the “third world” and potential advantages—in the long run. Because many countries (particularly in Africa, Latin America, and South Asia) lagged behind the “developed” world for so long, they are now not “catching up” but rather “leapfrogging” into the future. 

For example, the explosion in cell phone use in Latin America, Africa, and South Asia is in large part a result of bypassing traditional landline telephones. It also means that much of the cell phone infrastructure of the “third world” is built around G3 or G4 cell phone towers, since the earlier ones simply weren’t built.

What this means is that Africa, Latin America, and South Asia is moving rapidly into the 21st century with much more modern technologies at the core of their infrastructure. The dual problems of path dependence and the sheer cost of upgrading may become serious constraints for “first world” countries in the medium to long range. 

The next 100 years should be very interesting, indeed.

Inequality and New York’s Subway

From newyorker:

New York City has a problem with income inequality. And it’s getting worse—the top of the spectrum is gaining and the bottom is losing. Along individual subway lines, earnings range from poverty to considerable wealth. The interactive infographic here charts these shifts, using data on median household income, from the U.S. Census Bureau, for census tracts with subway stations: http://nyr.kr/11mEy8m

This is a really great way to map out inequality in an area. I’d love to see it done elsewhere (say, along a major US interstate).

Visualizing the Relationship Between Internet Usage and GDP per capita

From worldbank:

As a country’s GDP per capita increases, how do internet penetration rates change?

Ramiro Gómez, a Berlin based freelance software developer created a data visualization to show the percentage of Internet users in relation to the GDP per capita for countries from 1990 to 2011.

Get the data from the World Development Indicators

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Source: Visual.ly

World Bank Dataviz: How much money do migrants send home?

From worldbank:

Remittances – money sent home by migrants to family and friends – soared to record levels last year. Officially recorded remittances reached $500bn in one year, but we estimate that the true figure, including unrecorded and informal channels, may be even higher.

The Guardian has put together an interactive map using World Bank Migration and Remittance data to show how much money is sent from one country to another. India, shown below, is the greatest recipient of remittances.

Click here for the full interactive feature: http://bit.ly/U9c4PO

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From pritheworld:

What makes the breast cancer rate so high in Uruguay, but so low in Bolivia? 

Wow. That is a fascinating question!

From pritheworld:

What makes the breast cancer rate so high in Uruguay, but so low in Bolivia? 

Wow. That is a fascinating question!

Transparency vs Ease of Doing Business

Ah, but what’s the R-square?

Via worldbank:

The folks at The Economist  have taken data from the 2013 Doing Business Report to both highlight the most improved countries, and to combine it with the data behind Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index Ranking

Which goods do countries export?

Via worldbank:

This interactive shows what Uganda exported in 2009. Find out about trade flow of other countries in The Observatory of Economic Complexity. It includes a series of interactive  data visualizations of trade and export data from sources including UN Comtrade. The source code for the visualizations is available on github and you can get the data via their API.  

Wow.