Posts tagged Uganda

pritheworld:

Aquaponics is an almost climate-proof method of raising fish and vegetables using much less space, water and chemicals than land-based agriculture. The World profiled one Ugandan entrepreneur who uses the technology in his fish farm:

pritheworld:

Aquaponics is an almost climate-proof method of raising fish and vegetables using much less space, water and chemicals than land-based agriculture. The World profiled one Ugandan entrepreneur who uses the technology in his fish farm:

This in-depth, fascinating report on the hunt for Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, is well worth reading. It’s also great for discussions about international response, in various ways: Is foreign intervention justified? What should we do about Kony? But, most interestingly, what does the African Union’s intervention (coupled with its involvement in Somalia) tell us about increasing capabilities of African states?

The Hunt for Kony By Scott Johnson, thedailybeast.com
In Newsweek Mag­a­zine
Maj. Richard Kidega threaded his way through a thicket of sweet black trees and thorny underbrush when suddenly he drew to a halt. A young Ugandan soldier in front had raised a clenched fist: the sign to stop. With their AK-47s raised, Kidega and his men silently scanned the jungle for any signs of the enemy, such as fresh tracks or trampled brush. Hanging vines clogged the path. Dry leaves masked deep holes. The gully was an attractive place for an ambush. “It’s places just like this where the LRA likes to hide,” Kidega whispered, as the hunt for Joseph Kony, rebel leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, slowly moved ahead.
Read the rest

This in-depth, fascinating report on the hunt for Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, is well worth reading. It’s also great for discussions about international response, in various ways: Is foreign intervention justified? What should we do about Kony? But, most interestingly, what does the African Union’s intervention (coupled with its involvement in Somalia) tell us about increasing capabilities of African states?

The Hunt for Kony
By Scott Johnson, thedailybeast.com

In Newsweek Mag­a­zine

Maj. Richard Kidega threaded his way through a thicket of sweet black trees and thorny underbrush when suddenly he drew to a halt. A young Ugandan soldier in front had raised a clenched fist: the sign to stop. With their AK-47s raised, Kidega and his men silently scanned the jungle for any signs of the enemy, such as fresh tracks or trampled brush. Hanging vines clogged the path. Dry leaves masked deep holes. The gully was an attractive place for an ambush. “It’s places just like this where the LRA likes to hide,” Kidega whispered, as the hunt for Joseph Kony, rebel leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, slowly moved ahead.

Read the rest

This video about Joseph Kony, the leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) has gone viral. It’s a compelling thing to watch.

Since 1987, the LRA has waged a war to impose its extremist (and bizarre) version of “Christianity” in Uganda and Congo. The goal is to impose a strict theocratic regime based on the Ten Commandments, as interpreted by Kony, a self-proclaimed prophet. The method has been systematic rape, torture, mass killings, and other war crimes. Most of the LRA’s fighters are children. Human rights organizations estimate that as many as 10,000 children have been forced into service by the LRA, often forced to murder and/or rape their own relatives first.

Via sparklingcupcakepanda:

Stop Kony 2012

I also can’t resist tossing out this nugget, since it’s also International Women’s Day. Remember when Rush Limbaugh said these crazy things about women’s birth control a few days ago? Well, about six months ago Rush Limbaugh defended Josef Kony and the LRA.

PS. Yes, I’m also aware of the cynicism regarding the film—and the sudden interest it has generated in an issue that is nearly three decades old. For a good take on that, read this piece by The Atlantic. For a more nuanced, slightly less cynical take, you should read my friend Kohen Ari’s post. At the very least, open discussions about these kind of issues (and others: Syria, Burma, Tibet, etc.) and how to balance international responsibilities with national interests with moral obligations with the limited attention span of our contemporary culture is an important conversation. 

Museveni's Use Of Social Media To Keep Power In Uganda

My friend kohenari posted this. He’s right; it’s a fascinating counter-case to recent developments in the Middle East:

What happens when the authoritarian regime — rather than the disaffected people — uses social media to its advantage? This piece on Uganda from The New Republic provides us with an interesting example:

The month of February gave observers of African politics a curious case study in political geography. At one end of the Nile, protesters in Egypt were breaking the chains of autocracy through the revolution in Tahrir Square. At the other end of the Nile, voters in Uganda were preparing for an election that ultimately gave the country’s quasi-autocratic ruler, Yoweri Museveni, another five years in power. (He’s already had 25.) Yet, despite the fact that Uganda’s election was marred by vote-buying, localized violence, and other “irregularities,” so far, there’s been no real threat of large-scale demonstrations by disaffected citizens—despite calls for protests from a few opposition candidates. The way things look now, the revolution will not be heading south.

And yet, according to the cyber-utopians of the world, it shouldn’t have been this way, especially given the amount of blogging, texting, tweeting, and Facebook groups devoted to the election. Indeed, in the wake of the revolutions in North Africa, it’s become apropos to speak about social media as an inherently “liberating” force. In Egypt, despite the telecom blackout in the early days of the protests, the fact that a marketing executive from Google became one of the most recognizable faces of the revolution plays into a certain kind of narrative: that social media is a formidable tool in the back pockets of the would-be revolutionaries of the world.

In Uganda, though, something entirely different happened. Instead of “the people” harnessing the power of technology for the purposes of reform or change, it was the regime that deployed those tools to greatest effect.