Posts tagged Norway

From theatlantic:

A Different Justice: Why Anders Breivik Only Got 21 Years for Killing 77 People

As an American, or maybe just as a moral human being, it’s hard not to feel appalled, even outraged, that Norwegian far-right monster Anders Breivik only received 21 years in prison for his attacks last year, including a bombing in Oslo and a cold-blooded shooting spree, which claimed 77 lives. That’s just under 100 days per murder. The decision, reached by the court’s five-member panel, was unanimous. He will serve out his years (which can be extended) in a three-room cell with a TV, exercise room, and “Ikea-style furniture.” The New York Times quoted a handful of survivors and victims’ relatives expressing relief and satisfaction at the verdict. It’s not a scientific survey, but it’s still jarring to see Norwegians welcoming this light sentence.
Norway’s criminal justice system is, obviously, quite distinct from that of, say, the U.S.; 21 years is the maximum sentence for anything less severe than war crimes or genocide. Still, it’s more than that: the entire philosophy underpinning that system is radically different. I don’t have an answer for which system is better. I doubt anyone does. But Americans’ shocked response to the Breivik sentence hints at not just how different the two systems are, but how deeply we may have come to internalize our understanding of justice, which, whatever its merits, doesn’t seem to be as universal as we might think.

Read more. [Image: AP]

The reason this shocks Americans, is the reason Europeans think of us as “cowboys.” And they don’t mean it as a compliment. They view cowboys as an anachronistic 19th century throwback, an emblem of vigilantism and lynchings. Are they right?

From theatlantic:

A Different Justice: Why Anders Breivik Only Got 21 Years for Killing 77 People

As an American, or maybe just as a moral human being, it’s hard not to feel appalled, even outraged, that Norwegian far-right monster Anders Breivik only received 21 years in prison for his attacks last year, including a bombing in Oslo and a cold-blooded shooting spree, which claimed 77 lives. That’s just under 100 days per murder. The decision, reached by the court’s five-member panel, was unanimous. He will serve out his years (which can be extended) in a three-room cell with a TV, exercise room, and “Ikea-style furniture.” The New York Times quoted a handful of survivors and victims’ relatives expressing relief and satisfaction at the verdict. It’s not a scientific survey, but it’s still jarring to see Norwegians welcoming this light sentence.

Norway’s criminal justice system is, obviously, quite distinct from that of, say, the U.S.; 21 years is the maximum sentence for anything less severe than war crimes or genocide. Still, it’s more than that: the entire philosophy underpinning that system is radically different. I don’t have an answer for which system is better. I doubt anyone does. But Americans’ shocked response to the Breivik sentence hints at not just how different the two systems are, but how deeply we may have come to internalize our understanding of justice, which, whatever its merits, doesn’t seem to be as universal as we might think.

Read more. [Image: AP]

The reason this shocks Americans, is the reason Europeans think of us as “cowboys.” And they don’t mean it as a compliment. They view cowboys as an anachronistic 19th century throwback, an emblem of vigilantism and lynchings. Are they right?

The global recession (which is really mostly an Anglo-European recession, really) in housing prices. What’s interesting is looking at the countries that didn’t fall: Belgium, Switzerland, Norway, Netherlands, and Canada. What did they do right?
From publicradiointernational:

Chart from McKinsey Quarterly:

“We estimate that falling home prices erased more than $3.4 trillion of household wealth in 2008.”

curiositycounts:

A global view of the housing bubble

The global recession (which is really mostly an Anglo-European recession, really) in housing prices. What’s interesting is looking at the countries that didn’t fall: Belgium, Switzerland, Norway, Netherlands, and Canada. What did they do right?

From publicradiointernational:

Chart from McKinsey Quarterly:

“We estimate that falling home prices erased more than $3.4 trillion of household wealth in 2008.”

curiositycounts:

global view of the housing bubble

NPR Planet Money: “Norway Has Advice For Libya”
The concept of the “resource course” is a key concept in political economy. It marks the paradox that countries that have a significant resource (oil or other very expensive commodities) tends to ruin domestic economies—and tend to coincide with authoritarian regimes. Who did Norway escape this curse? Does it have any lessons for other countries?
An interesting podcast, to be sure. But … it doesn’t pay careful attention to one key detail: Norway was a consolidated democracy before it discovered oil. I’m not sure how easily those lessons will translate to a country that finds oil before it attempts to become a democracy.

NPR Planet Money: “Norway Has Advice For Libya”

The concept of the “resource course” is a key concept in political economy. It marks the paradox that countries that have a significant resource (oil or other very expensive commodities) tends to ruin domestic economies—and tend to coincide with authoritarian regimes. Who did Norway escape this curse? Does it have any lessons for other countries?

An interesting podcast, to be sure. But … it doesn’t pay careful attention to one key detail: Norway was a consolidated democracy before it discovered oil. I’m not sure how easily those lessons will translate to a country that finds oil before it attempts to become a democracy.

From motherjones (via shortformblog):


As Salon’s Glenn Greenwald points out, could you imagine any US politician saying that, ever?

Fascinating thing to say — for any leader.

Here’s another interesting perspective (form a former Israeli airport security official) on the distinction between the over-reliance on technology (the “illusion of safety”) & human critical thinking: “Man Versus Machine" (from Newsweek, November 27, 2010).

From motherjones (via shortformblog):

As Salon’s Glenn Greenwald points out, could you imagine any US politician saying that, ever?

Fascinating thing to say — for any leader.

Here’s another interesting perspective (form a former Israeli airport security official) on the distinction between the over-reliance on technology (the “illusion of safety”) & human critical thinking: “Man Versus Machine" (from Newsweek, November 27, 2010).

From shortformblog (via thepoliticalnotebook):

After the success of our recent piece on Rupert Murdoch, we felt that we would try this again with breaking news. We don’t have a good name for this idea yet, so for now we’re going to call it a Tumbl-zine — a magazine article designed for Tumblr. We will update this story as the situation changes, so please come back to ShortFormBlog’s article for the latest updates. (Sources used include: Reuters, BBC, The Telegraph, MSNBC, The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal)