Posts tagged North America

(Comparative) Fact of the Week: Oil Independence

A short (Comparative) Fact of the Week because of work obligations this week. But I thought I’d revisit gas prices.

Did you know that Canada has achieved energy independence? In fact, it did so decades ago. But did you also know that gas prices in Canada are about $US 4.00 per gallon? That’s because in a global economy, there’s no way to escape global market prices.

The NPR Planet Money team had a short snippet about this a few days ago.

Analysis of Wikipedia's "War of 1812" entry

Fascinating look at the role—and limitations—of using Wikipedia in the classroom. Or, actually, a great way to discuss historiographical debates. Also just a fascinating look at the role of “official” history and collective political culture.

Apparently, the American dream is about on par with the Turkish, Mexican, and Chilean dreams. 
From politicalprof:

How the United States compares: poverty, healthcare and other variables in comparison with OECD countries. From Charles Blow.

Apparently, the American dream is about on par with the Turkish, Mexican, and Chilean dreams. 

From politicalprof:

How the United States compares: poverty, healthcare and other variables in comparison with OECD countries. From Charles Blow.

An interesting case of indigenous rights, from the US.
From newshour:

“Plagued by an unemployment rate above 80 percent, arid land, few prospects for industry, abysmal health statistics and life-expectancy rates rivaling those of Haiti, it’s no wonder outsiders ask: Why do the nine tribes constituting the Great Sioux Nation, including those on Pine Ridge, staunchly refuse to accept $1.3 billion from the federal government?”
Why the Sioux Are Refusing $1.3 Billion
(PHOTO:  A young Lakota Sioux girl at the 26th annual Powwow on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. BY: Mike Fritz/PBS NewsHour)

An interesting case of indigenous rights, from the US.

From newshour:

“Plagued by an unemployment rate above 80 percent, arid land, few prospects for industry, abysmal health statistics and life-expectancy rates rivaling those of Haiti, it’s no wonder outsiders ask: Why do the nine tribes constituting the Great Sioux Nation, including those on Pine Ridge, staunchly refuse to accept $1.3 billion from the federal government?”

Why the Sioux Are Refusing $1.3 Billion

(PHOTO:  A young Lakota Sioux girl at the 26th annual Powwow on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. BY: Mike Fritz/PBS NewsHour)

Ohhhh, Canada!
Analysis of Canada’s parliamentary elections. For those interested in our friendly neighbors to the north (via ilyagerner; imagen from The Globe & Mail).

Ohhhh, Canada!

Analysis of Canada’s parliamentary elections. For those interested in our friendly neighbors to the north (via ilyagerner; imagen from The Globe & Mail).

Why don't other countries have government shutdowns?

An interesting explanation from Foreign Policy magazine. Basically, a unique feature of American presidentialism: Contrary to conventional wisdom, US presidents are rather “weak.” Other presidential systems often give executives discretionary power over the budget; in many cases, the budget (along w/ economic policy) is the prerogative of the president & the legislature only gives an up/down vote. 

World Education Rankings
A great visual breakdown of education levels across OECD countries. From publicradiointernational (via ilovecharts &  christopherchristopher):

Ben Wildavsky, senior fellow in research and policy at the Kauffman Foundation, and the author of The Great Brain Race: How Global Universities are Reshaping the World put these numbers in context last month for The Takeaway.
He warned people not to fall into a kind of “zero-sum thinking that somehow if  other countries are doing well, the gains come at our expense.”

World Education Rankings

A great visual breakdown of education levels across OECD countries. From publicradiointernational (via ilovecharts &  christopherchristopher):

Ben Wildavsky, senior fellow in research and policy at the Kauffman Foundation, and the author of The Great Brain Race: How Global Universities are Reshaping the World put these numbers in context last month for The Takeaway.

He warned people not to fall into a kind of “zero-sum thinking that somehow if other countries are doing well, the gains come at our expense.”

A great interactive map from The Atlantic looking at demographic enclaves in America. I live in a “Boom Town” (funny how Oxford doesn’t rate as a “Campus & Careers” enclave), surrounded by “Minority Central” on the west & “Evangelical Epicenters” on the east. Where do you live?

Interactive Map: The 12 States of America. Click to see data about America’s emptying nests, military bastions, Mormon outposts, moneyed burbs, tractor country, and more.
The map’s creators explain in an accompanying article:

We analyzed reams of demographic, economic, cultural, and political data  to break the nation’s 3,141 counties into 12 statistically distinct  “types of place.” When we look at family income over the past 30 years  through that prism, the full picture of the income divide becomes  clearer—and much starker.

[Image: Column Five Media, map interactivity by Daryle Maciocha]

A great interactive map from The Atlantic looking at demographic enclaves in America. I live in a “Boom Town” (funny how Oxford doesn’t rate as a “Campus & Careers” enclave), surrounded by “Minority Central” on the west & “Evangelical Epicenters” on the east. Where do you live?

Interactive Map: The 12 States of America. Click to see data about America’s emptying nests, military bastions, Mormon outposts, moneyed burbs, tractor country, and more.

The map’s creators explain in an accompanying article:

We analyzed reams of demographic, economic, cultural, and political data to break the nation’s 3,141 counties into 12 statistically distinct “types of place.” When we look at family income over the past 30 years through that prism, the full picture of the income divide becomes clearer—and much starker.

[Image: Column Five Media, map interactivity by Daryle Maciocha]

The Education of President Obama | New York Time Magazine

Cover story on the trials and challenges of actually conducting foreign policy as (compared to the rhetoric of campaigning for) president.