Posts tagged Netherlands

Exporting American Exceptionalism?

Over at The Monkey Cage, Erik Voeten has an interesting post  about how politicians in Europe (in this case, specifically, The Netherlands) are learning American political behavior. However, this is not necessarily a good thing. Writing about a far-right Dutch politician repeating Todd Akin’s infamous statement about “legitimate rape,” Voeker writes:

The SGP is one of the most reactionary parties in Europe. It is a Christian Conservative party that was finally forced in 2006 to allow women to become members. It still prohibits women from standing for elected office (although the Dutch Highest Court has ruled that something needs to be done about that). It would hardly seem necessary for a party like this to advertise its beliefs that women shouldn’t be allowed to choose much of anything. Yet, the party is routinely ignored by the media unless its spokespeople say something offensive about gays or women. However, even that is difficult. The party has long held that abortion should not be allowed even after rape. This viewpoint no longer gets the media juices flowing. Yet  the Akin theory that the female body has magical properties that shut down its reproductive channels in cases of rape seemed to do just that in the U.S. A nice opportunity to draw some attention a few weeks before an election.

For most politicians in most electoral settings mimicking Akin would be a bad idea. But the SGP has two seats in a proportional representation system. It would like to have three seats, as it did in the past. It is not going to attract mainstream voters so it has to draw the attention of voters with fringe ideologies. Geert Wilders has long been a master at this: looking at the US public space as a laboratory to figure out what types of opinions create maximally divisive responses; and thus attention. European political parties have long mimicked the campaign strategies of their American counterparts but now at least some of them also seem to be mimicking their campaign gaffes (although Van der Staaij was smart enough not to talk about “legitimate rape”).

This is an interesting comparison that could be viewed in at least two ways: What kind of parties outside the US make such statements? How do such statements work in other institutional contexts? But, also, what does this say about political discourse—both in America and abroad?

Is a political tsunami about to hit Europe? It’s starting to look a lot like what happened in the late 1990s in Latin America, which seem to have unleashed a tide of “left” and/or “populist” governments. Should we be paying more attention—during the presidential campaign—to the European economies? Would American voters react different than European voters to similar austerity measures?
From cnbc:

Another One Down? Dutch Government Near Collapse
Prime Minister Mark Rutte meet the Dutch queen on Monday afternoon and tendered his government’s resignation after talks on austerity collapsed at the weekend.  The Dutch government’s failure to reach an agreement in talks to achieve tough spending cuts could see ratings agencies cut the country’s prized AAA-rating and nervous investors push up the country’s borrowing costs.
Full Story

Is a political tsunami about to hit Europe? It’s starting to look a lot like what happened in the late 1990s in Latin America, which seem to have unleashed a tide of “left” and/or “populist” governments. Should we be paying more attention—during the presidential campaign—to the European economies? Would American voters react different than European voters to similar austerity measures?

From cnbc:

Another One Down? Dutch Government Near Collapse

Prime Minister Mark Rutte meet the Dutch queen on Monday afternoon and tendered his government’s resignation after talks on austerity collapsed at the weekend.  The Dutch government’s failure to reach an agreement in talks to achieve tough spending cuts could see ratings agencies cut the country’s prized AAA-rating and nervous investors push up the country’s borrowing costs.

Full Story

The global recession (which is really mostly an Anglo-European recession, really) in housing prices. What’s interesting is looking at the countries that didn’t fall: Belgium, Switzerland, Norway, Netherlands, and Canada. What did they do right?
From publicradiointernational:

Chart from McKinsey Quarterly:

“We estimate that falling home prices erased more than $3.4 trillion of household wealth in 2008.”

curiositycounts:

A global view of the housing bubble

The global recession (which is really mostly an Anglo-European recession, really) in housing prices. What’s interesting is looking at the countries that didn’t fall: Belgium, Switzerland, Norway, Netherlands, and Canada. What did they do right?

From publicradiointernational:

Chart from McKinsey Quarterly:

“We estimate that falling home prices erased more than $3.4 trillion of household wealth in 2008.”

curiositycounts:

global view of the housing bubble

I meant to post this earlier. Think US campaigns can be scary? Check out this campaign from a far-right party in The Netherlands. The party (Trots op Nederland) did well in its debut in the country’s 2009 municipal-level elections; but it failed to win any seats a year later in the 2010 Dutch national parliamentary elections

From politicalprof:

At least it’s not just us: a crazy ad from a Netherlands anti-immigrant party. You don’t even have to speak Dutch to get the point. h/t: The Monkey Cage.