Posts tagged Maps

mapsontheweb:

Ethnic composition of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, 1910

mapsontheweb:

Ethnic composition of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, 1910

nprontheroad:

This map isn’t much use for driving directions, but is in our heads as we drive: The United States and Mexico as they looked in 1830. What are now Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, California and parts of other states were in Mexico; Louisiana was a border state.

nprontheroad:

This map isn’t much use for driving directions, but is in our heads as we drive: The United States and Mexico as they looked in 1830. What are now Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, California and parts of other states were in Mexico; Louisiana was a border state.

theatlantic:

Map: What Country Does Your State’s Life Expectancy Resemble?

How California and Virginia can be as different as Liechtenstein and Brunei.
Read more. [Image: Olga Khazan/measureofamerica.org]


Ouch.

theatlantic:

Map: What Country Does Your State’s Life Expectancy Resemble?

How California and Virginia can be as different as Liechtenstein and Brunei.

Read more. [Image: Olga Khazan/measureofamerica.org]

Ouch.

From theatlantic:

Google Autocomplete Wants to Know Why Post-Communist Europe Is So Poor

It’s been two decades since the Iron Curtain fell, but post-communist Europe still has a long way to catch up—and Google autocomplete knows it.
Read more. [Image: Twitter: Randal Olson]


Beyond the specific issue of post communist countries, this is an interesting exercise. I wonder how Google autocomplete would fill in the maps of other continents …

From theatlantic:

Google Autocomplete Wants to Know Why Post-Communist Europe Is So Poor

It’s been two decades since the Iron Curtain fell, but post-communist Europe still has a long way to catch up—and Google autocomplete knows it.

Read more. [Image: Twitter: Randal Olson]

Beyond the specific issue of post communist countries, this is an interesting exercise. I wonder how Google autocomplete would fill in the maps of other continents …

newsweek:

40 more maps that explain the world

Via worldbank:

sunfoundation:

From The Atlantic:

Two researchers, Mark Graham and Stefano De Stabbata, at the Oxford Internet Institute have depicted the world’s “Internet empires” in a map, [above]. The map shows each nation’s most popular website, with the size of nations altered to reflect the number of Internet users there.

The map makes for a brief, informative look at how geographic—and universal—certain web tastes and habits are.

Oxford Internet Institute's note on the data:

The map uses freely available data retrieved Alexa on August 12th, 2013. The company has provided website analytics since 1996. Alexa collects data from millions of Internet users using one of over 25,000 different browser extensions, and the data used for this visualization were calculated “using a combination of the estimated average daily unique visitors to a site and the estimated number of pageviews on that site from users in that country over the past month”.

The data are visualised as a choropleth map, where the colour indicates each country’s most visited website. Starting from the evident dominance of two companies (Google and Facebook), whose colours (red and blue, respectively) cover most of the map, we styled the illustration as an old colonial map, and named it after the computer game series Age of Empire. A second map illustrates the same data, using the hexagonal cartogram of the Internet Population 2011.

Nice.

Mapping Billions of Tweets Around the World

worldbank:

Via Mashable:

“Ever wonder what it would look like to plot every single geotagged tweet since 2009 on a map? Twitter has done just that…They use billions of geotagged tweets: Every dot represents a tweet, with the brighter colors showing a higher concentration of tweets.”

Europe: 

image

Tokyo: 

image

Sao Paolo: 

image

Moscow:  

image

North America:

image

Source: Flickr and Mashable

Inequality and New York’s Subway

From newyorker:

New York City has a problem with income inequality. And it’s getting worse—the top of the spectrum is gaining and the bottom is losing. Along individual subway lines, earnings range from poverty to considerable wealth. The interactive infographic here charts these shifts, using data on median household income, from the U.S. Census Bureau, for census tracts with subway stations: http://nyr.kr/11mEy8m

This is a really great way to map out inequality in an area. I’d love to see it done elsewhere (say, along a major US interstate).

From explore-blog:

Neil Freeman redraws the US into 50 new states with equal population.
(↬ kottke)

I could get used to this.

From explore-blog:

Neil Freeman redraws the US into 50 new states with equal population.

( kottke)

I could get used to this.