Posts tagged Libya

Watching The Daily Show and The Colbert Report (the only TV news worth watching anymore) I caught this bit on Colbert. Around the one minute mark, my head almost exploded: “Did I just hear a FOX News commentator call Muammar Gaddafi a ‘key US ally’?” Apparently, yes, yes I did.

For those of us old enough to remember, Gaddafi could never be described as a “key US ally” in any context. In fact, my first clear American political memory was watching news footage of the 1986 bombing of Libya ordered by Ronald Reagan. And for millions of people, the name Lockerbie will always be associated w/ Gaddafi.

I understand that conservative media wants to attack the administration. But did a “serious” news analyst really just say something so utterly ridiculous that anyone halfway paying attention would’ve sat up & stared blankly at the screen in disbelief? Apparently, yes.

The rest of the bit is funny. But I was surprised (and even a little disappointed) Colbert didn’t jump on that red meat. 

If we judge all Muslims for the behavior of a few of then, is it fair for them to judge all Christians by the bigotry of a small percentage?
From shortformblog:

joshsternberg:

12 Photos of Libyans Apologizing To Americans — Buzzfeed

This is must-read Buzzfeed.
</blockquote

If we judge all Muslims for the behavior of a few of then, is it fair for them to judge all Christians by the bigotry of a small percentage?

From shortformblog:

joshsternberg:

12 Photos of Libyans Apologizing To Americans — Buzzfeed

This is must-read Buzzfeed.

</blockquote

Hip Hop and the Arab Uprisings | openDemocracy

A fascinating roundup of hip hop artists from around the “Arab Spring” countries. This is a great way to learn more about the story of the year through its interaction with pop culture—as well as a great way to learn about how pop culture (and, in some way, globalization) is reshaping modern Arab societies.

The story has embedded videos by MC Swat (Libya), Lowkey (Palestine), and Kazeboon (Egypt). There also links to many others, including more famous (in the West) figures like El Général (Tunisia).

But it’s also a reminder of a time when hip hop in America was also about “issues”—not just about money, hype, and sex. Here’s hoping for an NWA comeback tour.

From thepoliticalnotebook:

Remembering Gaddhafi’s Four Decade Rule from Another Angle. In the days following his death and the official liberation of Libya, there were any number of retrospectives on Gaddhafi’s rule. Most, while interesting and relevant, focused very much on timelines of Gaddhafi himself. Gaddhafi’s life and family and speeches and rhetoric and relationships with other countries and not quite as much on the Libyan people who died under his rule. This infographic, which is a timeline, but in a rough sense of the word, is a brief but telling sample of some of the people whose lives were lost, both Libyan and foreign, as a result of Gaddhafi’s decisions and policies. These include students and teachers who were publicly executed on campuses in Tripoli and Benghazi, the suspension of free speech, the assassinations of expatriate Libyans living abroad, the casualties of terrorist activity associated with the Gaddhafi regime, and finally, notable losses during the revolution. The size limitation on Tumblr makes it hard to read so, click here to see the large size photo in detail.

From thepoliticalnotebook:

Remembering Gaddhafi’s Four Decade Rule from Another AngleIn the days following his death and the official liberation of Libya, there were any number of retrospectives on Gaddhafi’s rule. Most, while interesting and relevant, focused very much on timelines of Gaddhafi himself. Gaddhafi’s life and family and speeches and rhetoric and relationships with other countries and not quite as much on the Libyan people who died under his rule. This infographic, which is a timeline, but in a rough sense of the word, is a brief but telling sample of some of the people whose lives were lost, both Libyan and foreign, as a result of Gaddhafi’s decisions and policies. These include students and teachers who were publicly executed on campuses in Tripoli and Benghazi, the suspension of free speech, the assassinations of expatriate Libyans living abroad, the casualties of terrorist activity associated with the Gaddhafi regime, and finally, notable losses during the revolution. The size limitation on Tumblr makes it hard to read so, click here to see the large size photo in detail.

How do you fix a problem like Libya?

In the past, I’ve given my POL 102 classes (and also my upper-division democratization seminars) an assignment that asked them to draw up a new constitution for Oz. I handed out a packet of a post-transition (after the Wizard is deposed) Oz, a description of the country’s current political situation (mostly based on Gregory Maguire’s Wicked), and asked them to write a brief outline for a new constitutional system looking at three basic components:

  1. An executive system: They could choose between presidential, parliamentary, and semi-presidential.
  2. An electoral system: They could choose between simple plurality (“first-past-the-post”), majoritarian (the French runoff system), proportional representation, mixed-member system, and preferential voting system (this year, I decided to toss in the uniquely Chilean binomial system). If they choose presidential or semi-presidential, they would have to choose two electoral systems (one for the executive, one for the legislature).
  3. State structure: They could chose between unitary, federal, or devolved state.

These are group projects of 4-5 students, who write a two-page paper and give a short in-class presentation “pitching” their constitutional framework. Essentially, I ask them to become “constitutional engineers” for a day.

This year, thanks to the Arab Spring, we can use real world cases. So today my students are presenting sketches of the kind of constitutional system they think is best for a new democratic Libya. I’m very intrigued to see what they come up with.

If you don’t think political scientists really do this kins of “hands-on” activity, here’s a short article from The Christian Science Monitor interviewing UNC’s Andrew Reynolds about his advice for post-transition constitutions for the Arab Spring countries. The issue isn’t just academic for Reynolds (one of the discipline’s premier constitutional engineers): He’s currently in Libya for this very purpose, having only recently left Tunisia.

A link to a good discussion on the lessons from Libya.

From kohenari:

I wrote a whole lot about intervening in Libya back in March (here, herehere, and here), much of it which centered around the responsibility to protect doctrine.

Now that the intervention might be called a success, what do the good folks at Bloggingheads have to say? Hear Dan Drezner and Heather Hurlburt on the question of whether we should regard the intervention in Libya as a victory for R2P or as one that ultimately did damage to the doctrine.

This issue is going to a &#8220;must-read&#8221; for anyone interested in 21st century politics.
From theeconomist:

Tomorrow’s cover today: the fall of Muammar Qaddafi will transform Libya, the Middle East and NATO.

This issue is going to a “must-read” for anyone interested in 21st century politics.

From theeconomist:

Tomorrow’s cover today: the fall of Muammar Qaddafi will transform Libya, the Middle East and NATO.

File under &#8220;humor&#8221;.
From thenewrepublic:

Over the weekend, Colonel Muammar Qaddafi lost his grip on a title that he had held, with no signs of relinquishing, for many decades. Yes, you guessed it: the World’s Ugliest Dictator. With the colonel’s departure, there is an unprecedented opportunity for an enterprising and ugly dictator to step in and claim the top spot. But who’s the most qualified? Without further ado, TNR brings you the new, post-Qaddafi-era rankings of the top ten ugliest dictators in the world.

File under “humor”.

From thenewrepublic:

Over the weekend, Colonel Muammar Qaddafi lost his grip on a title that he had held, with no signs of relinquishing, for many decades. Yes, you guessed it: the World’s Ugliest Dictator. With the colonel’s departure, there is an unprecedented opportunity for an enterprising and ugly dictator to step in and claim the top spot. But who’s the most qualified? Without further ado, TNR brings you the new, post-Qaddafi-era rankings of the top ten ugliest dictators in the world.

From evanfleischer:

Just saw a tweet that said 700 of the “Tripoli Brigade” — featured in this Al Jazeera report from June — have landed in Tripoli.

In case anyone is still paying attention to Libya, which seems to be nearing the end game.

"The Finance Minister Who Robbed A Bank" | NPR Planet Money

It’s not what you think. In one of the most interesting NPR Planet Money podcasts, we get a difference perspective on the current situation in Libya: Ali Tarhouni, the new finance minister for the Libyan rebel (anti-Gadhafi) government had to find a way to finance his government. The problem? The key to the foreign cash reserves at the branch of the central bank in Benghazi (rebel-controlled) was in Tripoli (Gadhafi-controlled). So Tarhouni had to figure out how to break into his own government’s bank.