Posts tagged India

globalvoices:


“India has won! Victory for India. Good days coming up ahead.”

The ruling Congress party and its allies have suffered a crushing defeat and have already conceded failure, even before the final tally has been announced.
Indians Choose Narendra Modi and Bharatiya Janata Party in Historic Landslide

Perhaps the most important election that no one paid any attention to.

globalvoices:

“India has won! Victory for India. Good days coming up ahead.”

The ruling Congress party and its allies have suffered a crushing defeat and have already conceded failure, even before the final tally has been announced.

Indians Choose Narendra Modi and Bharatiya Janata Party in Historic Landslide

Perhaps the most important election that no one paid any attention to.

timemagazine:

TIME’s international edition. Ahead of elections, Indians are expressing anger and frustration over the direction of their country. Will the politicians listen? 

timemagazine:

TIME’s international edition. Ahead of elections, Indians are expressing anger and frustration over the direction of their country. Will the politicians listen? 

theatlantic:

Fighting Violence Against Women In India With Heavy Metal

To outsiders, the loud, aggressive world of heavy metal might seems like an unlikely place to find progressive politics. But any metalhead worth their leather can attest that the genre has often commented on society’s ills. Black Sabbath railed against the Vietnam War, Nuclear Assault offered apocalyptic visions of Reagan’s ‘80s, Sepultura howled scathing condemnations of the treatment of indigenous tribes in their native Brazil, Napalm Death addressed government failures and corruption, and more recently, Cloud Rat roared about sexism and urban blight atop a grindcore soundtrack. Thrash metal, in particular, has a long-running habit of tackling sociopolitical subjects with its rough barked vocals, wailing solos, and frenetic shredding.
In both a geographical and cultural sense, Mumbai seems about as far as one can get from the California Bay Area where the thrash-metal movement reached its apex. But the Indian band Sceptre offers proof of just how widely this style has spread. Inspired by their American forebears in Exodus and DRI and the music of classic German thrash bands like Kreator and Sodom, Sceptre recently celebrated its 15 anniversary, and is distinguished as one of India’s longest-running metal bands. Their latest recording taps into their genre’s liberal-leaning ideological tradition in a way that’s refreshing and urgent in modern India.
Age of Calamity is a concept album that deals with the plight of women in Indian society, and all proceeds from its sales will go directly to benefit a girls’ orphanage in Mumbai. Its haunting cover artwork was created by Indian artist Saloni Sinha, and depicts a weeping woman cradling her head in her hands, surrounded on all sides by crumbling walls and grasping shadows. It’s a powerful image, and in keeping with the theme, the band chose to work with a female artist.
Read more. [Image: Sceptre]

theatlantic:

Fighting Violence Against Women In India With Heavy Metal

To outsiders, the loud, aggressive world of heavy metal might seems like an unlikely place to find progressive politics. But any metalhead worth their leather can attest that the genre has often commented on society’s ills. Black Sabbath railed against the Vietnam War, Nuclear Assault offered apocalyptic visions of Reagan’s ‘80s, Sepultura howled scathing condemnations of the treatment of indigenous tribes in their native Brazil, Napalm Death addressed government failures and corruption, and more recently, Cloud Rat roared about sexism and urban blight atop a grindcore soundtrack. Thrash metal, in particular, has a long-running habit of tackling sociopolitical subjects with its rough barked vocals, wailing solos, and frenetic shredding.

In both a geographical and cultural sense, Mumbai seems about as far as one can get from the California Bay Area where the thrash-metal movement reached its apex. But the Indian band Sceptre offers proof of just how widely this style has spread. Inspired by their American forebears in Exodus and DRI and the music of classic German thrash bands like Kreator and Sodom, Sceptre recently celebrated its 15 anniversary, and is distinguished as one of India’s longest-running metal bands. Their latest recording taps into their genre’s liberal-leaning ideological tradition in a way that’s refreshing and urgent in modern India.

Age of Calamity is a concept album that deals with the plight of women in Indian society, and all proceeds from its sales will go directly to benefit a girls’ orphanage in Mumbai. Its haunting cover artwork was created by Indian artist Saloni Sinha, and depicts a weeping woman cradling her head in her hands, surrounded on all sides by crumbling walls and grasping shadows. It’s a powerful image, and in keeping with the theme, the band chose to work with a female artist.

Read more. [Image: Sceptre]

globalvoices:


I have always loved the Indian headshake – but now I LOVE it even more. This is brilliant.

A lot of people confuse themselves about what the Indian head shakes mean and how to communicate using the same.
Decoding Indian Headshakes In Less Than Two minutes

globalvoices:

I have always loved the Indian headshake – but now I LOVE it even more. This is brilliant.

A lot of people confuse themselves about what the Indian head shakes mean and how to communicate using the same.

Decoding Indian Headshakes In Less Than Two minutes

India's successful polio campaign a model for other countries

theatlantic:

Three Ways to Improve U.S. Healthcare, as Demonstrated by India

Listening to caregivers from other countries, it’s easy to feel exasperated about U.S healthcare. American hospitals are filled with good people trying to do good work, but at every turn the system of misplaced incentives gets in the way of good patient care.
Indeed, the most pressing problem with American healthcare is that it is too wasteful.
Read more. [Image: Tsering Topgyal/AP]


Interesting. I wonder why we don’t look at India more often? It’s the world’s largest democracy, after all.

theatlantic:

Three Ways to Improve U.S. Healthcare, as Demonstrated by India

Listening to caregivers from other countries, it’s easy to feel exasperated about U.S healthcare. American hospitals are filled with good people trying to do good work, but at every turn the system of misplaced incentives gets in the way of good patient care.

Indeed, the most pressing problem with American healthcare is that it is too wasteful.

Read more. [Image: Tsering Topgyal/AP]

Interesting. I wonder why we don’t look at India more often? It’s the world’s largest democracy, after all.

There’s a lot of ideas about higher ed that we might consider from other countries’ systems (free tuition, standardized entrance exams, etc.). I hadn’t considered this one before. 
From theatlantic:

India’s Bold Solution to the U.S. College Crisis: Federal Universities

A system of national universities would (1) fight the rise in tuition, and (2) accommodate all those smart second-generation kids whose parents we should be recruiting to our country in droves. But it will also help the nation in a 3rd way by giving us an outlet for higher research spending. The U.S. has been spending less and less on R&D as a percentage of our GDP, even as R&D becomes more and more important. In part because of this, there are legions of PhDs being forced to take private-sector jobs in which they have no expertise. These trends need to be reversed in order to maintain America’s status as the leading technological nation. And a system of federal universities is the perfect vehicle to increase research spending and provide an outlet for all those PhDs.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

There’s a lot of ideas about higher ed that we might consider from other countries’ systems (free tuition, standardized entrance exams, etc.). I hadn’t considered this one before. 

From theatlantic:

India’s Bold Solution to the U.S. College Crisis: Federal Universities

A system of national universities would (1) fight the rise in tuition, and (2) accommodate all those smart second-generation kids whose parents we should be recruiting to our country in droves. But it will also help the nation in a 3rd way by giving us an outlet for higher research spending. The U.S. has been spending less and less on R&D as a percentage of our GDP, even as R&D becomes more and more important. In part because of this, there are legions of PhDs being forced to take private-sector jobs in which they have no expertise. These trends need to be reversed in order to maintain America’s status as the leading technological nation. And a system of federal universities is the perfect vehicle to increase research spending and provide an outlet for all those PhDs.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

India gets ignored far too much, but it’s impact on global development is going to be huge in the next decade. Time to start paying attention to the world’s second largest country (and one of the five largest economies).
From futurejournalismproject:

Disrupting Tablets from the Bottom Up
How a $20 tablet from India could blindside PC makers, educate billions and transform computing as we know it.
Hint: The Indian government currently has an order in for 100,000 Aakash 2 tablets for university students and professors, and Datawind, the company behind the low-priced Android tablet, already has 4 million pre-orders.
Image: Suneet Tuli, CEO Datawind, with the company’s Aakash 2 tablet. Via Quartz.

India gets ignored far too much, but it’s impact on global development is going to be huge in the next decade. Time to start paying attention to the world’s second largest country (and one of the five largest economies).

From futurejournalismproject:

Disrupting Tablets from the Bottom Up

How a $20 tablet from India could blindside PC makers, educate billions and transform computing as we know it.

Hint: The Indian government currently has an order in for 100,000 Aakash 2 tablets for university students and professors, and Datawind, the company behind the low-priced Android tablet, already has 4 million pre-orders.

Image: Suneet Tuli, CEO Datawind, with the company’s Aakash 2 tablet. Via Quartz.

From pritheworld:

Female Soldiers Guarding the India-Pakistan Border

Photos from the New York Times’ Lens Blog.

Fascinating example of pictures telling a story on their own.

It’s important to remember, there are plenty of nations in the nuclear club already. Here’s a list of states with nuclear weapons.
From shortformblog:

India tests nuclear-capable missile: Unlike the one North Korea recently tested, this actually worked, leading government officials to hail the launch as “proof that the country has taken its place among the world’s most powerful and scientifically advanced nations.” With a reach of 3,100 miles, the missile can conceivably reach Beijing and Shanghai, but not many other Chinese cities. While it’s not as powerful as it could be, it does add a degree of complexity to the diplomatic situation in the region. (photo by India’s Ministry of Defense/AP)

It’s important to remember, there are plenty of nations in the nuclear club already. Here’s a list of states with nuclear weapons.

From shortformblog:

India tests nuclear-capable missile: Unlike the one North Korea recently tested, this actually worked, leading government officials to hail the launch as “proof that the country has taken its place among the world’s most powerful and scientifically advanced nations.” With a reach of 3,100 miles, the missile can conceivably reach Beijing and Shanghai, but not many other Chinese cities. While it’s not as powerful as it could be, it does add a degree of complexity to the diplomatic situation in the region. (photo by India’s Ministry of Defense/AP)