Posts tagged Brazil

theeconomist:

Map: Welcome to Italordan
The richest part of Brazil, around the capital, Brasília, is as wealthy as Italy, measured by GDP per person in 2011 (at market exchange rates). India, meanwhile, is much poorer than even the most destitute Brazilian states, Maranhão and Piauí, where income per head is roughly equal to that of Jordan.
See an interactive version of the map with GDP and population here

theeconomist:

Map: Welcome to Italordan

The richest part of Brazil, around the capital, Brasília, is as wealthy as Italy, measured by GDP per person in 2011 (at market exchange rates). India, meanwhile, is much poorer than even the most destitute Brazilian states, Maranhão and Piauí, where income per head is roughly equal to that of Jordan.

See an interactive version of the map with GDP and population here

csmonitor:

Brazil’s Bolsa Familia: Welfare model or menace?
Big change for a buck? Latin America says ‘yes’
A welfare check under fire in Brazil

I’ve already added this to my Latin America politics syllabus for the future (along with more non-“scholarly” articles). I may add it to my intro to comparative politics syllabus, too. Few comparative politics courses cover social policy. They should. We could learn a lot from the mistakes and successes of other countries. And, IMO, bolsa familia is a great success.

csmonitor:

Brazil’s Bolsa Familia: Welfare model or menace?

Big change for a buck? Latin America says ‘yes’

A welfare check under fire in Brazil

I’ve already added this to my Latin America politics syllabus for the future (along with more non-“scholarly” articles). I may add it to my intro to comparative politics syllabus, too.

Few comparative politics courses cover social policy. They should. We could learn a lot from the mistakes and successes of other countries. And, IMO, bolsa familia is a great success.

Via westernhemisphereanalysis:

Poll numbers out of Brazil (via Ibope: Dilma vence no 1º turno mesmo se Marina for candidata - politica - politica - Estadão)

Looks like Rousseff (PT) will likely win the first round presidential race in Brazil. But remember: If no candidate wins 50%, there’s a runoff election. Crazy things can happen in runoffs.

Via westernhemisphereanalysis:

Poll numbers out of Brazil (via Ibope: Dilma vence no 1º turno mesmo se Marina for candidata - politica - politica - Estadão)

Looks like Rousseff (PT) will likely win the first round presidential race in Brazil. But remember: If no candidate wins 50%, there’s a runoff election. Crazy things can happen in runoffs.

globalvoices:

Dilma Rousseff’s UN speech was met with praise from digital rights advocates around the world. Human rights lawyer Eduardo Bertoni argues that this is a positive development, but actions speak louder than words, he cautions.
Brazil: the New Internet Freedom Champion?

Brazil is increasingly playing a stronger role in global affairs. This is another good example.

globalvoices:

Dilma Rousseff’s UN speech was met with praise from digital rights advocates around the world. Human rights lawyer Eduardo Bertoni argues that this is a positive development, but actions speak louder than words, he cautions.

Brazil: the New Internet Freedom Champion?

Brazil is increasingly playing a stronger role in global affairs. This is another good example.

Via theatlantic:

Brazil Looks To Its Indigenous Tribes for New Olympic Archers

To win Olympic medals, a country needs lots of talent, the resources to train that talent, and the desire to spend those resources, as my colleague Matt O’Brien put it.
As host of the 2016 Olympics, Brazil has plenty of incentive to rake in as much Olympic gold as possible, and with almost 200 million people, it has quite the talent pool, too.
What’s more, the country has discovered that certain segments of its sizeable population come prepackaged with Olympic-worthy skills. Why train new Olympic archers, the thinking seems to be, when some Brazilians have already been shooting arrows since they were the size of a quiver?
Read more. [Image: Reuters/Paulo Whitaker]


Not sure if this is interesting, genius, or a tad bit racist. Thoughts?

Via theatlantic:

Brazil Looks To Its Indigenous Tribes for New Olympic Archers

To win Olympic medals, a country needs lots of talent, the resources to train that talent, and the desire to spend those resources, as my colleague Matt O’Brien put it.

As host of the 2016 Olympics, Brazil has plenty of incentive to rake in as much Olympic gold as possible, and with almost 200 million people, it has quite the talent pool, too.

What’s more, the country has discovered that certain segments of its sizeable population come prepackaged with Olympic-worthy skills. Why train new Olympic archers, the thinking seems to be, when some Brazilians have already been shooting arrows since they were the size of a quiver?

Read more. [Image: Reuters/Paulo Whitaker]

Not sure if this is interesting, genius, or a tad bit racist. Thoughts?

Via venezuelablog:

"Latin Pulse" takes various paths this week to analyze several important issues arising during June. The program includes a focus on the protests that have struck Brazil during the past month. The driving forces behind these wide-ranging protests are complex and demonstrate the various policies that Brazilians want changed, including less corruption and less police brutality. The other central focus of the program covers the diplomatic discussions between the United States and Venezuela to normalize relations between the countries. The news segment covers the passage of immigration reform by the U.S. Senate.

The program includes in-depth interviews with:

Matt Taylor of American University; and
David Smilde of the University of Georgia.

(David Smilde is also of the editor of the blog, Venezuelan Politics & Human Rights, which is sponsored by the Washington Office on Latin America: http://venezuelablog.tumblr.com/ )

Executive Producer: Rick Rockwell
Associate Producer: Curt Devine.

The photo of street protestors in Brazil is by Fernando Henrique C. de Oliveira of Belo Horizonte via Flickr using a Creative Commons license: www.flickr.com/photos/leftyjoe/9092527969/

Probably worth a follow on SoundCloud.

globalvoices:

Brazil’s already got a first world stadium, now it only needs to build a country around it!

While Tahiti was scoring a historic goal against Nigeria inside a stadium specially renovated for the FIFA Confederations Cup, Brazil’s military police helicopters sprayed teargas on  demonstrators protesting increased bus fares in Belo Horizonte.

At the same time, at least 60,000 protesters gathered in São Paulo city and coordinated protests took place in another 10 Brazilian state capitals on June 17, 2013, as part of the fifth demonstration called by the Free Fare Movement São Paulo, a group that opposes rising bus fares in Brazil.

The demonstations which started in Sao Paulo, have spread to the whole country and are being called the Vinegar Revolt, ever since protesters used vinegar-soaked cloths to protect themselves from police adamant on dispersing them with teargas on June 13.

Nothing Can Stop Brazil’s Vinegar Revolt, Not Even FIFA

Next year’s World Cup is going to be very interesting.

pritheworld:

When the US economy took a nosedive five years ago, Brazil’s economy hardly skipped a beat. With this economic shift in fortunes, migration patterns between the two countries have shifted as well. But as The World’s Jason Margolis found out, not very cleanly. 


Fascinating!

pritheworld:

When the US economy took a nosedive five years ago, Brazil’s economy hardly skipped a beat. With this economic shift in fortunes, migration patterns between the two countries have shifted as well. But as The World’s Jason Margolis found out, not very cleanly. 

Fascinating!

Chávez: Father of the poor?

Here’s another way to think about Chávez, from a “father’s” perspective: I love my children. So if I were to find out that I had a terminal illness, I would ensure that they were taken care of. I’d make sure I had a guardian appointed, some funds set aside for college, etc. In other words, I’d plan for a future for them without me and prepare an orderly transition that would minimize their anxiety. By all accounts, Chávez did none of that. So, tell me again how much he loved the Venezuelan people?

(I was prompted to think about this after a former student of mine reminded me of the book Father of the poor? about the mid-20th century Brazilian populist, Gêtulio Vargas. I regularly assign the book in my Populism in Latin American seminar.)

Defense Spending & Aircraft

Fellow Tumblrer Politicalprof has a great nugget on the costs (and relatively uselessness) of the F-22 fighter and its relation to budget debates in DC. 

But here’s an interesting (comparative) comment about one of the key arguments Politicalprof makes about how modern military needs (i.e. fighting the Taliban) are different from conventional military needs of the past (i.e. fighting the Soviets) and our need to address those, rather than just buy fancy hardware. He suggests replying to anyone who argues against cutting defense spending with the mantra “F-22.”

I’ve got a better one: “Super Tucano.”

Why? Because the Super Tucano is precisely the kind of military hardware the US needs for its current (and hear future) tactical operations. It’s a prop-based airplane manufactured by Embraer, the Brazilian air manufacturing giant (you’ve probably flown on their planes if you flew domestically in the US. The plane (which kind of looks like a modern P-51 Mustang, of WWII fame) is specifically designed as a counter-insurgency, close air support, and reconnaissance aircraft. Brazil designed them for use in the dense Amazon regions to fight drug smuggling along its borders with Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia.

Surely the US doesn’t need a prop-base airplane in the 21st century, you laugh. Well, I think the Pentagon does. What makes me so confident? The US agreed to purchase 200 of them in 2010. Each one costs about $9-14 million. That’s less than four percent the cost of a single F-22. And there’s already excitement about deploying them to Afghanistan (where not a single F-22 ever flew a mission).

But not so fast. The Super Tucano deal was suspended after a suit by American aircraft manufacturer Hawker Beechcraft (with help from some friends in Congress). At some point, our military will finally be able to deploy something like the Super Tucano to Afghanistan. But not until the legal issues are sorted out. Because nothing says “I support our troops and their mission” like delaying an existing, useful piece of military hardware to ensure your constituents get to sell them to the military.

So, yeah. Next time someone tells you we need to keep military spending high to ensure the effectiveness of our troops, just tell them: “Super Tucano.”