thenewrepublic:

COVER STORY: Don’t Send Your Kid to the Ivy League.
“I used to think that we needed to create a world where every child had an equal chance to get to the Ivy League. I’ve come to see that what we really need is to create one where you don’t have to go to the Ivy League, or any private college, to get a first-rate education.”

Yes!

thenewrepublic:

COVER STORY: Don’t Send Your Kid to the Ivy League.

I used to think that we needed to create a world where every child had an equal chance to get to the Ivy League. I’ve come to see that what we really need is to create one where you don’t have to go to the Ivy League, or any private college, to get a first-rate education.”

Yes!

What Do You Do with an Open Carry?

kohenari:

My friend David Nelson has written a thoughtful piece about his recent experience of walking with his kids in his neighborhood past someone openly carrying a gun.

His conclusion is terrific:

Open Carry Guys aren’t openly carrying because they happen to be hunting, and that’s how hunting works. They aren’t Open Carrying because they are on the job (like a security guard or armed-car driver) and their job requires they be armed. They are openly carrying in order to make a political statement about a foggy area of the law. Our job, as citizens, is to clear that fog. It gets cleared by the courts, and that means folks getting arrested, having their day, and duking it out. As responsible citizens, it’s quite arguably our *responsibility* to usher these activists into the system so that they can move their issue forward and we can all live under a clear and reasonable set of legal expectations for public behavior.

Yep. I’d call the police.

In response to his charitable campaign, Beck’s listeners evidently flooded him with threats made against his life and work… So much for the Christian mission of mercy and tenderness. For Beck’s enraged audience, any act of kindness, no matter how small — the immigrants would have eaten whether or not Beck served the food, and ‘millions of dollars’ were never on offer — was too great a risk.

Immigration, charity, and conservatives’ unholy assault on Glenn Beck

When Glenn Beck announced he would deliver food and toys to immigrant children, the attacks were blistering — and profoundly unchristian

(via theweekmagazine)

This is amazing in its awfulness.

Via globalvoices:

image

When it comes to Wikipedia, the Russian government’s computers are busy bees. Over the past ten years, IP addresses belonging to various Russian state agencies are responsible for almost 7,000 anonymous edits to articles on Wikipedia’s Russian-language website.

It’s entirely plausible that these revisions are the work of state employees acting on their own, out of genuine interest in “setting the record straight.”

The Russian Government’s 7,000 Wikipedia Edits

Ah, 21st Century,  information wars.

globalvoices:


Mugu, one of the poorest districts in Nepal, doesn’t have a single football stadium. But it does have a star football player as revered as Argentina’s famous son Lionel Messi – and she happens to be a girl.
Sunakali and her team were welcomed home there after winning the women’s national football tournament as if they had won the World Cup in Brazil, reported Mysansar, a popular Nepalese blog.
The young women left their mountainous district for the first time to compete in the tournament in Kailali, a journey of hundreds of kilometers. They walked two days to reach the airstrip, and travelled in a plane, rickshaw and bullock cart for the very first time in their lives. There are no direct roads between Kailali and Mugu, and the ones that do exist are in poor condition.
At the tournament, the Mugu team played with Badikhel Team of Lalitpur district, Baliya Team of Kailali and Team Patharaiya before meeting with Team Tikapur in the finals. Team Mugu won and Sunakali was named the best striker.
It was an impressive achievement for many reasons, including the fact that the young women were only introduced to the sport in 2011. In Mugu, the average life expectancy is reported to be 47 years, with men at 49 and women at 39. Nearly two-thirds of girls aged 15 to 19 are married, and female literacy rate stands at 9 percent. 

When the victorious team returned, locals met them at the airstrip chanting, “Sunakali, like Messi!” Horses were arranged for the young women to ride back to the village, an honor in Mugu where it is unusual for women to ride the animals. 

This Young Woman Footballer Is More Popular Than Messi in Her Remote Village in Nepal

globalvoices:

Mugu, one of the poorest districts in Nepal, doesn’t have a single football stadium. But it does have a star football player as revered as Argentina’s famous son Lionel Messi – and she happens to be a girl.

Sunakali and her team were welcomed home there after winning the women’s national football tournament as if they had won the World Cup in Brazil, reported Mysansar, a popular Nepalese blog.

The young women left their mountainous district for the first time to compete in the tournament in Kailali, a journey of hundreds of kilometers. They walked two days to reach the airstrip, and travelled in a plane, rickshaw and bullock cart for the very first time in their lives. There are no direct roads between Kailali and Mugu, and the ones that do exist are in poor condition.

At the tournament, the Mugu team played with Badikhel Team of Lalitpur district, Baliya Team of Kailali and Team Patharaiya before meeting with Team Tikapur in the finals. Team Mugu won and Sunakali was named the best striker.

It was an impressive achievement for many reasons, including the fact that the young women were only introduced to the sport in 2011. In Mugu, the average life expectancy is reported to be 47 years, with men at 49 and women at 39. Nearly two-thirds of girls aged 15 to 19 are married, and female literacy rate stands at 9 percent. 

When the victorious team returned, locals met them at the airstrip chanting, “Sunakali, like Messi!” Horses were arranged for the young women to ride back to the village, an honor in Mugu where it is unusual for women to ride the animals. 

This Young Woman Footballer Is More Popular Than Messi in Her Remote Village in Nepal

A Moderate Voice On Israel and the Palestinians

kohenari:

I have a guest blog post up at the Houston Chronicle's TexasSparkle blog this morning. Of course, you can also read it right here:

Over the past few weeks, extremism and violence once again escalated and finally exploded in Israel and the Gaza Strip. Space for a moderate position on the decades-old conflict shrinks at times like this, especially on the internet where partisans of each side can lash out at one another and at anyone else who doesn’t agree wholeheartedly with the purity of their side’s cause. As someone who teaches a course on Israeli politics and the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, I try to adopt what I consider a balanced position and, as a result, I tend to draw a fair amount of anger from everyone. In the past few days alone, I’ve been called a bigot and Nazi by extremist supporters of the Palestinians, and a self-hating Jew and Nazi by extremist supporters of the Israelis. I tend to view their ire as evidence that my position is a relatively balanced one.

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I think I agree with everything above.

globalvoices:

Are you a bilingual expert on Latin America, who values justice, equality, friendship across borders and can’t seem to get enough of the Internet? Do you enjoy working from home? Global Voices is looking for you!
To apply: Please submit a résumé and a cover letter that highlights your work and explains why you would be a great fit for Global Voices by August 15. Apply by emailing us at adminjobs@globalvoicesonline.org with your name and ”Latin America Editor” in the subject line.
Global Voices Is Looking for a Passionate Leader to Shape Our Latin America Coverage

globalvoices:

Are you a bilingual expert on Latin America, who values justice, equality, friendship across borders and can’t seem to get enough of the Internet? Do you enjoy working from home? Global Voices is looking for you!

To apply: Please submit a résumé and a cover letter that highlights your work and explains why you would be a great fit for Global Voices by August 15. Apply by emailing us at adminjobs@globalvoicesonline.org with your name and ”Latin America Editor” in the subject line.

Global Voices Is Looking for a Passionate Leader to Shape Our Latin America Coverage

In the Face of Uncertainty, a Ritual Calendar Emerges

venezuelablog:

Image posted on President Nicolas Maduro’s official twitter account @NicolasMaduro, on March 5, 2014

Hugo Perez Hernáiz and David Smilde

During a difficult year in which the future of Chavismo has become increasingly uncertain, the Maduro government has continued to construct a civil religion around the figure of Hugo Chávez through a continual flow of ritual events.

These ceremonies construct a narrative in which XIX Century independence struggle against imperial Spain is constantly linked to the life of Chávez and his personal struggle against new forms of imperialism. Indeed the life and death of Chávez himself is narrated as the reenactment of the life of Venezuela’s independence hero Simón Bolívar. President Maduro emphasized this connection in his speech on July 5, Venezuela’s Independence Day. 

We are here today to make effective the message of independence that was enacted 200 years ago in this land of Venezuela, a great battle of ideas, a battle by those who were willing to open a historical time to the new man and women that live in this fatherland. We are aware today more than ever that this is a legacy left to us by Comandante Chávez. Today…we can say that thanks to Simón Bolívar, thanks to the men and women of our time, at 16 months of the physical passing of our Comandante Hugo Chávez, we have to infinitely thank our Comandante for giving us dignity.    

Looking back at the first half of 2014 we can trace the multiple ceremonial events that are being used to construct a new civil religion.

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Interesting, although food costs may be different across the cases.

Interesting, although food costs may be different across the cases.

Who gets shot in America: What I learned compiling records of carnage for the New York Times

politicalprof:

diebythegun:

An insightful look at who gets shot in America by the woman who has made it her work to catalog them, one at a time.

Politicalprof: A must read from the editor who compiled Joe Nocera’s gun violence blog. My favorite lines:

But while half of the shootings I featured were the result of a crime, the other half, I was most surprised to learn, resulted from arguments — often fueled by alcohol — among friends, neighbors, family members and romantic partners. More and more, people are solving their differences not with their fists but with guns. Husbands and wives are shooting each other, as are sisters and brothers. In many homes across America, loaded guns are easily accessible, and children find them, accidentally shooting themselves or each other. One hundred children died in unintentional shootings in the year after Newtown, which breaks down to two every week.

Because freedom.