theatlantic:

Africa’s Tech Edge

How the continent’s many obstacles, from widespread poverty to failed states, allowed African entrepreneurs to beat the West at reinventing money for the mobile age
Read more. [Image: Mike McQuade]

theatlantic:

Africa’s Tech Edge

How the continent’s many obstacles, from widespread poverty to failed states, allowed African entrepreneurs to beat the West at reinventing money for the mobile age

Read more. [Image: Mike McQuade]

newsweek:

U.S. workforce more concentrated in large — and largely low-paid — occupations | Pew Research Center

unicef:

The world is full of amazing children. Sometimes, we just have to take a moment to recognize one. Today, that child is is Ashol-Pan, a 13-year-old Mongolian girl who carries on her culture’s tradition of hunting with a golden eagle. She may just be the only girl on the planet with this very unique skill.

Check out photographer Asher Svidensky’s jaw-dropping images of her on BBC News Magazine: http://uni.cf/1mcT252     

This. Is. Amazing.

In other words: Political money and hence influence at the top levels is disproportionately white, male, and with almost no social context that includes significant numbers of African Americans and other people of color.

This is why money isn’t speech. Freedom of speech as a functional element in democratic life assumes that such freedom can be meaningfully deployed. But the unleashing of yet more money into politics allows a very limited class of people to drown out the money “speech” of everyone else—but especially those with a deep, overwhelmingly well documented history of being denied voice and presence in American political life.

newyorker:

Evan Osnos on what it means when politicians are literally shooting laws: http://nyr.kr/1mdty7J

“It is a politics in which the practitioners of government, those who seek the highest offices in the land, declare open season on the laws they are charged with passing and enforcing.”

Above: A still from Joe Manchin’s “Dead Aim” advertisement.

I don’t know of a single other profession in which one auditions for a job by announcing that he (a) dislikes the profession and/or (b) has no interest in developing a knowledge of said profession and/or (c) announces his intention to bring down his employer.

newyorker:

Evan Osnos on what it means when politicians are literally shooting laws: http://nyr.kr/1mdty7J

“It is a politics in which the practitioners of government, those who seek the highest offices in the land, declare open season on the laws they are charged with passing and enforcing.”

Above: A still from Joe Manchin’s “Dead Aim” advertisement.

I don’t know of a single other profession in which one auditions for a job by announcing that he (a) dislikes the profession and/or (b) has no interest in developing a knowledge of said profession and/or (c) announces his intention to bring down his employer.

guardian:

The human cost of the Bangladeshi garment industry
How did the clothes you’re wearing get to you? We trace the human cost of the Bangladeshi garment industry in video, words and pictures. View the interactive

guardian:

The human cost of the Bangladeshi garment industry

How did the clothes you’re wearing get to you? We trace the human cost of the Bangladeshi garment industry in video, words and pictures. View the interactive

shortformblog:

pewresearch:

As Business Insider put it, “Watch America age 110 years in one gif.”
See more on the demographic transformation of The Next America here. 

Anyone else find it intriguing that there will be more people over the age of 85 in 2060 than there will be people in their late 70s?

This isn’t that intriguing. Every bar seems to represent a cohort of five years. As people live longer, the 85+ cohort will include decades, not five year blocks. Unless the scale is adjusted, it should get a little top heavy.

shortformblog:

pewresearch:

As Business Insider put it, “Watch America age 110 years in one gif.”

See more on the demographic transformation of The Next America here

Anyone else find it intriguing that there will be more people over the age of 85 in 2060 than there will be people in their late 70s?

This isn’t that intriguing. Every bar seems to represent a cohort of five years. As people live longer, the 85+ cohort will include decades, not five year blocks. Unless the scale is adjusted, it should get a little top heavy.

adam-wola:


  "Judicial independence and the rule of law are at risk. What does this mean? That anybody, without any grounds, can come and accuse a judge in order to avoid being judged. The door to impunity and corruption is being opened."


— Yassmin Barrios is the Guatemalan judge who, in a historic case last May, ruled that a former military dictator, Gen. Efraín Ríos Montt (1982-83), was guilty of genocide. Gen. Ríos Montt presided over a scorched-earth anti-guerrilla campaign that killed thousands of civilians in the countryside, many of them members of indigenous groups. For decades afterward, he enjoyed not only freedom but political power, even serving as president of the legislature.

He was thought to be untouchable until Judge Barrios’s ruling. It raised hopes that perhaps, for the first time in history, Guatemala was approaching accountability for both rights abusers and those who collaborate with organized crime.

Judge Barrios’s sentence, however, was overturned shortly afterward by a narrow vote in the country’s Constitutional Court, and the Ríos Montt trial must restart again sometime in the future (many doubt that it will).

And now comes the real insult.

One of Gen. Ríos Montt’s defense lawyers went to Guatemala’s equivalent of a bar association (Colegio de Abogados y Notarios de Guatemala) and said that Judge Barrios had unethically “humiliated” him during the trial. The association—which, shall we say, is not a force for progressive change in Guatemala—has suspended Judge Barrios from practicing law for a year and fined her the equivalent of US$650.

Guatemala has long been under the sway of large landowners, military officers, organized crime figures, and corrupt politicians, who have maintained their grip on wealth and power through brutal means. These “hidden powers" suffered some setbacks in the past couple of years.

But today, the backlash is in full force. If anything, Judge Barrios’s warning, in an interview published Monday, is too timid.

This deserves more attention.

adam-wola:

"Judicial independence and the rule of law are at risk. What does this mean? That anybody, without any grounds, can come and accuse a judge in order to avoid being judged. The door to impunity and corruption is being opened."

— Yassmin Barrios is the Guatemalan judge who, in a historic case last May, ruled that a former military dictator, Gen. Efraín Ríos Montt (1982-83), was guilty of genocide. Gen. Ríos Montt presided over a scorched-earth anti-guerrilla campaign that killed thousands of civilians in the countryside, many of them members of indigenous groups. For decades afterward, he enjoyed not only freedom but political power, even serving as president of the legislature.

He was thought to be untouchable until Judge Barrios’s ruling. It raised hopes that perhaps, for the first time in history, Guatemala was approaching accountability for both rights abusers and those who collaborate with organized crime.

Judge Barrios’s sentence, however, was overturned shortly afterward by a narrow vote in the country’s Constitutional Court, and the Ríos Montt trial must restart again sometime in the future (many doubt that it will).

And now comes the real insult.

One of Gen. Ríos Montt’s defense lawyers went to Guatemala’s equivalent of a bar association (Colegio de Abogados y Notarios de Guatemala) and said that Judge Barrios had unethically “humiliated” him during the trial. The association—which, shall we say, is not a force for progressive change in Guatemala—has suspended Judge Barrios from practicing law for a year and fined her the equivalent of US$650.

Guatemala has long been under the sway of large landowners, military officers, organized crime figures, and corrupt politicians, who have maintained their grip on wealth and power through brutal means. These “hidden powers" suffered some setbacks in the past couple of years.

But today, the backlash is in full force. If anything, Judge Barrios’s warning, in an interview published Monday, is too timid.

This deserves more attention.

When students ask why they have to read

teachinginreallife:

I’m like:

image

What’s the difference between someone who’s illiterate and someone who chooses not to read? There isn’t one.